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1985 $1 Indentation On Inner Ring Both Sides

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 13 / Views: 12,796Next Topic  
New Member

Australia
36 Posts
 Posted 01/10/2014  05:21 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add deathandwar to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
can anyone tell my son Brody why this is like it is



New Member
Australia
36 Posts
 Posted 01/10/2014  05:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add deathandwar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
we have both started noodling in earnest with all our change ,Brody has really embraced the forum and has found this one dollar today and is quite excited about he ring
Pillar of the Community
Australia
2004 Posts
 Posted 01/10/2014  06:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mr T to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I think it is a mark left by a coin rolling/sorting machine but I'm not completely sure.
Formerly nancyc
Australia
5298 Posts
 Posted 01/10/2014  4:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nevol to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This question has been asked several times, but no really conclusive explanation has been put forwarded.

For it to be caused by a coin rolling machine (CRM) or similar, one would only expect to see it on one side of the coin, not on both, or else the coin pictured has at some time been the end coin in a roll, with first the Obv visible, and then the Rev.

I'm certainly not convinced that it's caused by a CRM, and would love to hear any other theories as to how it is caused.

By the way, how old is Brody?
life is a mystery to be lived not a problem to be solved
Valued Member
Australia
271 Posts
 Posted 01/10/2014  4:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sfitzernator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm not sure what it is, but I have come across this a lot in the "84 & "85's, only in well circulated coins. It is generally accompaynied by a thicker looking rim. The mark on the inside of the rim look a lot like somebody ran around the rim with a lead pencil, bit I think it's too common for this to be the case.
New Member
Australia
36 Posts
 Posted 01/10/2014  6:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add deathandwar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
brody is 12 years old, I dont think it is a pencil as it dosnt wash off
Valued Member
Australia
354 Posts
 Posted 01/10/2014  7:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jpl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very Interesting coin D/War.
Will follow this Post & do a little reading on this!
jpl..

PS. Can anyone provide some Previous "Threads" on this Subject?
Pillar of the Community
Australia
750 Posts
 Posted 01/10/2014  8:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add The Unicorn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Quite common on the 1985's especially. No idea of exact cause.

Here's a previous link.

https://www.coincommunity.com/forum...=1985%2C%241

Valued Member
Australia
271 Posts
 Posted 01/11/2014  12:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sfitzernator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
brody is 12 years old, I dont think it is a pencil as it dosnt wash off


No, not pencil, it just looks that way. I wonder tho, does a 10cent fit snugly inside the rim. I wonder if it could be a chemical reaction between the two?
New Member
Australia
36 Posts
 Posted 01/11/2014  05:11 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add deathandwar to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
a 10c piece does appear to fit snuggley inside, this is only taken by my dodgey eyes tho, what is your theory on the chem reaction
Pillar of the Community
Australia
1000 Posts
 Posted 01/11/2014  05:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add oh my florin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
sfitzernator I believe would be refering to the process of electrolysis which is pretty much different metals have different electric charges and if two are put together a transfer of electrons would take place between the two creating the effect you see there
Pillar of the Community
Australia
750 Posts
 Posted 01/11/2014  06:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add The Unicorn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Now I think we're getting closer to the answer. How about a copper 2c which were still around with the 84 / 85 etc and would explain why this doesn't happen in later years eg: post 1992. I think it's time to try sitting a couple for a while as a test. I think we might find there are 1986 and 1988 coins with the rings if we look hard enough, though they would not have had quite as much exposure to the 2c as the 84 / 85's.

Valued Member
Australia
271 Posts
 Posted 01/11/2014  06:27 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sfitzernator to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Just a crazy idea that there could be a reaction between the rim of the 10cent cupro-nickel and the just inside the rim area of the $1 Al/Br. Throw in the sweat/oils from human fingers? It could be chemical, or even physical. I have noticed that a lot of these older 84&85 $1 coins seem to have thicker rims, for whatever reason, and the 10cent seems to fit nicely inside. I have caught myself playing with coins in my pocket, and kind of "snapping a 10cent" into a $1 coin. I also automatically "stack 10cent"s onto $1 coins when going through a pile of change. These have now been out there for near on 30 years, with enough people doing the same thing, could there be a reaction that has happened over time?
Formerly nancyc
Australia
5298 Posts
 Posted 01/11/2014  6:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nevol to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I have seen this on unc coins too. My current hypothesis is that this happened in the upsetting machine as the rims were being put on the planchets.
I missed this reply by 'thesandpit' in the previous thread, posted 10/19/2011 at 07:20 am, and have to say I'm inclined to agree with him. Given that the marks do not appear to be on the surface of the devices, one can only assume that the marks are under the devices, therefore, had to have occurred prior to the coin being struck.

life is a mystery to be lived not a problem to be solved
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