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What Causes Different Types Of Proofs?

 
 
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 Posted 07/26/2017  02:58 am Show Profile   Check spruett001's eBay Listings Bookmark this topic Add spruett001 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
This is something I've been wondering about lately. I was looking for a 1955 Jefferson nickel proof tonight and with these, one can get a mirror proof, cameo proof and a deep cameo proof.

Were the differences intentional? They all came from the same mint. What, during the minting process, causes the inconsistencies of proof type?

It seems that what is intended can be reproduced ad infinitum. Why the variation?
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 Posted 07/26/2017  03:34 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MontCollector to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
How clean/polished the dies are? Just a guess.
Edited by MontCollector
07/26/2017 03:35 am
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 Posted 07/26/2017  05:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add John1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As the dies wear, it changes the kind of proof the coin will end up being. It starts out as a DCP then wears to a CP and then a brilliant proof with no frost at all.
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 Posted 07/26/2017  10:06 am  Show Profile   Check Andrew99's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Andrew99 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It used to be unintentional and was due to an early strike. Frosted coins from the 1940's and the 1800's are very expensive as they are rare. Sometime in the late 1960's the mint realized you can produce a deep cameo by sandblasting the die with ultra-fine powder and then polishing the flat surfaces. Thats why they all look like that now. Deep cameo's today are a matter of intentionality. Proofs from the early 1960's and before are not and so deserve a premium.
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 Posted 07/26/2017  10:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Used to use sandblasting, but I think they use laser etching for cameo proofs these days.

Fields would be polished with 50,000 or 100,000 diamond grit.
That is what I use for final polish of faceted sapphires.
(I also happen to be a gemstone facetor).
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 Posted 07/26/2017  10:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jpsned to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Didn't they also have "matte" proofs in the old days?
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 Posted 07/26/2017  10:54 pm  Show Profile   Check spruett001's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add spruett001 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the responses! I just never really thought about it until looking for nickel proofs around the late '50s to late '60s that seems to be a transition period. For instance, I have a '68 cameo proof and then a '70 brilliant proof and it made me go

Is die wear also the reason for brilliant, PL and DMPL Morgan dollars?
Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum.
-Lucretius
"Just because you're paranoid don't mean they're not after you."
-Kurdt Kobain
"Language is the source of misunderstandings."
-Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
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 Posted 07/27/2017  12:21 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coin197 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yes. On Morgan dollars, the more a die is used, the more luster you will see as a result of flow lines. Of course, it also depends on how bold the strike is. It also depends on how properly a die was hardened. On a real DMPL, you should see no 'cartwheels' whatsoever.
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 Posted 07/28/2017  11:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add histman to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting question. I think Andrew99 has it right. They started doing it on purpose because of collectors.
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