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1990 Lincoln Memorial Cent I found error or PMD.  
 

 
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 Posted 09/12/2017  11:21 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Coin2Coin to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hey guys I'm new to the forum. I've been collecting coins for quite a while now about 7 years now and I came across this coin at first I just put it aside and said damaged coin . Well I decided to take another look cause it felt smooth and normal PMD coins have roughness to the feel of them and just feel off and you know that the coin is damaged. Well I am posting pics with this and to explain a little with the pics --- the coin is smooth and feels as a new coin does when released for circulation all the deep scratches and abrasions are really smooth and consistent I need to know if this is an error known to come out of the mint or if it is truly PMD I just can't see it being PMD due to his it is all hust so smooth and if it was caused after it left the mint with this kind of damage the scratches would be rough and have sharpness to it but it is all just so smooth and rounded on the edges . It's perfectly smooth and rounded inside them and on all the edges plus the toneing is consistent through the entire coin I figure if it was PMD the scratches would not be the same exact color and toned the same as the rest of the coin I truly believe that this coin was an error that made it out of the mint. I think that maybe the part of the machine that places the final copper cap on was damages and dis this but . PLEASE HELP ME LOL !



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 Posted 09/12/2017  11:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CGCoins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Definitely PMD on this one. Not something that can be done at the Mint.
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 Posted 09/12/2017  11:42 pm  Show Profile   Check Errors and Varietys's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Errors and Varietys to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
PMD. No extra value and only worth 1 cent.
Errors And Varietys.
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 Posted 09/13/2017  12:40 am  Show Profile   Check Crazyb0's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Crazyb0 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Wire cutters, Little Johnnie in the Garage raided daddy's toolbox,...again! Too bad we can't spank misbehaving brats anymore......

to the funny farm!
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 Posted 09/13/2017  01:05 am  Show Profile   Check spruett001's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add spruett001 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


I agree with the others. This coin definitely has post-mint damage ( PMD). There is no reasonable explanation for how this would have happened at the Mint and highly resembles someone squeezing it all around with some sort of tool like wire cutters.

Keep searching and never hesitate to post anything else of interest or you have questions about!


Quote:
I figure if it was PMD the scratches would not be the same exact color


That's only because the copper plating was depressed as well into the marks along with the zinc core. If you look very closely, you may be able to find lines in the damage where the plating split and exposed grey-colored zinc.
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Edited by spruett001
09/13/2017 01:09 am
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 Posted 09/13/2017  01:56 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coin2Coin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hey guys thanks for the information but I am an electrician and sign installer by trade and this has definitely not been done by any type of dikes wire cutters or linesman pliers the gouges start out wider at the beginning on the edge of the coin and taper into a fine point on most of these gouges towards the center of the coin and Within These gouges the lines are from left to right and each line has a raise section between it as if it was put in by the reeded edge of the edge of a coin which is definitely weird because no tool that I know of has The Cutting Edge start out fat at one part and taper down so I definitely know for a fact that this wasn't done by any type of tool squeezing it I have been in construction all my life and if it was done buy a tool it would have caused the edges where who gouges are maze to be sharp and a lighter color of copper as if it was fresh copper new copper this isn't the case on this coin in addition as I described in the previous original post the edges and inside where the damage is the gouges everything is very smooth and all the coloring and toning to this coin the patina the Aging of the copper everything else this consistent throughout the coin and continues to be consistent where all the gouges are I just don't know if there is some part of the coin making process where a machine may have hit this or maybe if it had fallen off of the conveyor and possibly gotten hit by some type of Machinery there but that's why I'm asking you guys although it could be post mint damage the fact of the damage itself does not relate to any type of cutters not that I've used anyway and I have done many trades in the construction field in like I say I'm an electrician sign installer now most cutting edges like on scissors lineman's pliers wire cutters Etc they all have a smooth Cutting Edge so when you cut the item it makes a nice clean-cut on this coin it's more like the edge of a needle-nose plier where it's fat at one end and tapers down small on the other end because the lines go from left to right and the cut goes from up to down so I would say yeah needle nose pliers but they do not make a set of needle-nose pliers this small and also the fashion of the damage looks like the coin was rolling on edge or whatever hit it was spinning when it hit it hey guys thanks for the information but I am an electrician and sign installer by trade and this is definitely not been done by any type of dykes wire cutters or linesmans pliers the gouges just start out wider at the beginning on the edge of the coin and taper into a fine point on most of these gouges towards the center of the coin and within these gouges the lines are from left to right and each line has a raise section between it as if it was put in by the reided edge of a coin which is definitely weird because no tool that I know of has the cutting edge start out fat at one part and taper down so I definitely know for a fact that this wasn't done by any type of tool squeezing it I have been in construction all my life and if it was done by a tool it would have caused the edges where the gouges are made to be sharp and a lighter color of copper as if it was fresh copper new copper this isn't the case on this coin in addition as I described in the previous original post the edges and inside where the damage is the gouges everything is very smooth and all the coloring and toning to this coin the patina the aging of the copper everything else is consistent throughout the coin and continues to be consistent we're all the gouges are I just don't know if there is some part of the coin making process wear a machine may have hit this or maybe if it had fallen off of the conveyor and possibly gotten hit by some type of machinery there but that's why I'm asking you guys although it could be post mint damage the fact of the damage itself doesn't look like any type of Cutters not that I've used anyway and I have done many trades in the construction field and like I said I'm currently an electrician sign installer now most cutting edges like on scissors linemans pliers wire cutters excetera they all have a smooth cutting edge so when you cut the item it makes a nice clean cut on this coin it's more like the edge of a needle nose pliers where its fat at one end and tapers down small on the other end because the lines go from left to right raised inside sections that are not uniform or consistant inconsistant the cut goes from up to down so I would say yeah needle nose pliers but they do not make a set of needle nose pliers this small and also the fashion of the damage looks like the coin was rolling on edge or whatever hit it was spinning when it hit it and cause the damage if there are any other ideas to what may have happened with this coin now greatly appreciate it and for all of you that who answered and gave me the information you did I want to thank you again
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 Posted 09/13/2017  02:58 am  Show Profile   Check spruett001's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add spruett001 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I know what you're thinking about wire-cutters and other hand tools. The problem arises when you use them to "cut" something as thick as a cent. The cutters pivot on an axis so more pressure is applied closer to the pivot and less as the cut moves outward onto the ends of the tool. So, the edge impressions will be wider than the farther-in cuts.

I'm also pretty familiar with quite a few tools. Take some wire cutters (or dykes but, really, "diags") and cut a heavy-gauge wire halfway. You'll see that the point is much narrower than the edge impression.

As you mentioned, it may have been needle-nose pliers and, yes, they can be that small. However, the force needed at the end of very small needle-nosed pliers to create those impressions is too much to realistically consider.

It could have been a hatchet blade or a chisel or half a pair of scissors (a scissor?) for that matter.

The main question lies in what, during the the minting process, could have created that. I'm at a loss. I suggest learning more about how coins are minted. That will give you much knowledge in regard to whether a coin is an error or not.
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 Posted 09/13/2017  06:27 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@coin2coin, first welcome to CCF. Second, while I would never recommend purposefully defacing a coin, one could hypothetically take a pair of wire cutters and try to duplicate these marks.
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 Posted 09/13/2017  08:45 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add uruman to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
, nothing else just, PMD
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 Posted 09/13/2017  08:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add moxking to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As has been mentioned, when you follow the minting process you will realize that at no stage could the damage shown on your coin occur during that manufacturing.
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 Posted 09/13/2017  11:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Chase007 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I agree with moxking,this damaged occurred outside of Mint and it is man made, if you follow the cuts/indents on the edge and flip the coin over you will notice an exact depression at the exact location on reverse,that's an indication that it was squeezed by some type of tool,now what ever it may have been or called!
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 Posted 09/17/2017  3:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coin2Coin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you All , for your advise and taking the time to help me out on this. You are all awesome thanks again . I am really liking this site and appreciate how nice and proffesional you all are . I look forward to posting other coins I have and discussing the errors and everything else that goes along with our amazing currency creating abilities we have here in the US.
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