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Questiins about a foreign silver coin or trade coin dated 1780  
 

 
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Valued Member
United States
68 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  04:45 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Mckinley_4th to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hey I need help identifying this coin! My mom cleaned out her junk drawer today and found this and told me I could have it! I think it's pretty neat and has great detail on both sides! I would like to know what country it's from, what metal it's made from, the value and it's worth or is it worth keeping at all?!?

Bedrock of the Community
Australia
14350 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  07:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Originally struck in the date shown, but restruck up until about 1930, by many European Mints outside Austria. They were used as trade coins throughout the Middle east. They were trusted for their consistently good silver.

That is why this one is in such nice condition.

They can be identified by the experts, by the cartouche that is after the date.
Valued Member
United States
103 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  07:58 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bjherbison to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Types described: http://www.theresia.name/en/

I appears to be III/C/SF/(e)/1-3-1, which narrows it down to five mints, probably Vienna.
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United States
15185 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  10:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add moxking to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Value is a bit more than silver content. Most sell in the $10-12 price range. Keep in mind that the date of 1780 has nothing to do with the actual date it was minted in.
Valued Member
Canada
56 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  11:33 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add gg_cu to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
They are still being struck today with the 1780 date, as collector proofs from the Vienna mint.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1506 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  2:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Arkie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
NGC currently has melt value at $12.50.

https://www.NGCcoin.com/price-guide...duid-1221520
Edited by Arkie
03/13/2018 2:17 pm
Valued Member
United States
68 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  4:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mckinley_4th to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you for explaining this to me! It's pretty cool coin and nice to know a little more about the history and detail! I appreciate it a lot
Valued Member
United States
314 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  5:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add srcliff to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I see it has a loop soldered on but why is it not centered on the middle top of the coin? That would bug me, always hanging crooked.
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Australia
12833 Posts
 Posted 03/13/2018  9:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Probably because it's not actually soldered, but screwed on. The band of metal is held in place around the coin by a small screw passing through the top. If the screw is too loose, then the coin can move. You might need special jeweller's tools to adjust the screw.

Such a holder causes the least amount of damage to a coin, but it will still damage the coin. So don't take the mount off; since the coin itself is not worth very much to collectors, it is now worth more as jewellery than a damaged coin. You might, however, try to loosed the mount further so you can rotate the coin properly, then tighten it again.

Regarding the silver fineness: the official fineness was .833, and this was adhered to by almost everyone who made trade replicas of them; Rome mint examples are .835, for example. This fineness is lower than that of American (.900) or Canadian (.925) circulating silver coins.

Oh, and here's the Wikipedia page for the Maria Theresa thaler.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Valued Member
United States
314 Posts
 Posted 03/16/2018  08:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add srcliff to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A cool piece anyway especially if you are starting a European coin collection.
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