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What is this? It's on the back of an 1858 penny. (Flying Eagle Cent)

 
 
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 Posted 11/20/2018  9:33 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Bvozar1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
It's on the back of an 1858 Flying Eagle penny.



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 Posted 11/20/2018  9:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@Bvozar1, first welcome to CCF. Second, if this back side of the coin is dished, then perhaps you have one side of an old Magician's coin. As it is hard to tell depth from your photo, can you please confirm that the coin gets thinner in the center compared with the rims? Then again, maybe this is wrong--normally the denticles wouldn't be there just a vertical edge so that the other half could be slid into place. Maybe add a pic of the edge and other side of this coin? Thx.
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 Posted 11/20/2018  9:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add JimmyD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to the CCF

It looks like it has been milled out for some reason.
In any case, it wan't done during the minting of the coin so it PMD.
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 Posted 11/20/2018  11:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Mark1959 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Agree, look like somebody got a precision jewelers lathe and was practicing.
Completed the Dansco 8166 Album
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 Posted 11/21/2018  11:20 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


to the CCF!
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 Posted 11/22/2018  2:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Kurrency Ken to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yeah, definitely lathe work.

KK
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 Posted 11/27/2018  7:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ExoGuy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This post reminded me of a counterstamp in my collection. Note the similar lathing effect; this, done prior to the application of the merchant's logo stamp. I'm not suggesting that this was the intent of the machinist who operated on the OP's cent. Having studied many counterstamped coins over the years, those that evidently passed through the hands of metal workers, I've simply noted that many an early machinist would use a coin to test his work skills.



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 Posted 11/27/2018  7:54 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting theory. The confined work area of a ground cent would be a challenge, I think you're saying.
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 Posted 11/27/2018  8:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ExoGuy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Interesting theory. The confined work area of a ground cent would be a challenge, I think you're saying.


Yes. This was precision work on both pieces. The OP's coin was perhaps a test or practice exercise. The copper-nickel cents were, at their time of issue, one of, if not THE hardest metal products used for standard coinage. What better piece then to serve as a guinea pig?
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