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How Can I Test To See If I Have A 1946 Transitional Nickel?

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Valued Member
United States
77 Posts
 Posted 02/20/2020  10:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ShineOn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
You have that backwards. Acetone leaves a residue, which is best removed using IPA.

And 99% isopropyl is made for cleaning and/or drying electronic parts. It removes oils and water. It doesn't have random chemicals as the 1% - more often than not, because of the hydrophilic properties of isopropyl alcohol, the bulk if not 100% of the 1% is water.

It is far more likely that any residue you might see from iso is either from materials dissolved from the surface of what it was applied to, or from whatever was used to apply it.

Furthermore, 99% Isopropyl alcohol is completely neutral PH 7. No corrosive properties, either acidic or alkalinic.
Edited by ShineOn
02/20/2020 10:42 pm
Valued Member
United States
77 Posts
 Posted 02/22/2020  3:59 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ShineOn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I have been attempting to refine my SG measurements (wt in air, wt in water) and the results are all over the place. It seems more often than not the War Nickels are under 9, often under the 8.92 of cu/ni nickels.

I changed my rig to use a bent paper clip to rest the coin on to get its wt in water, first zeroing the scale with the empty paper clip thang, then lowering the coin on the paper clip into the water at the same depth as the paper clip was when zeroed. I felt the dental floss net thing was drawing water up into itself (capillary action) skewing the results.

The closest I have gotten using the revised method is with a 1985D nickel. Using the redesigned rig I get a SG of 8.950089, a tad high.

All the wartime nickels I have tested so far have been low. The closest to 9.25 SG is a 1945 D warnick at 9.01989...
Valued Member
United States
77 Posts
 Posted 02/23/2020  5:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ShineOn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Testing my SG methodology, using a silver quarter and a 95% copper penny:

Silver quarter: dry weight=6.082g wt in water=0.594 SG= 10.23906
Copper penny: dry weight=3.101g Wt in water=0.348 SG= 8.85387

Both are within 1% of their respective standard. I tested with a few more of each and was within 1% of standard each time.

Exact same methodology gives SG of wartime nickels (I tested all I have) mostly at less than 9.0 and frequently less than the 8.92 standard for non-wartime nickels.

The non-wartime nickels I tested as a control, test out between 8.89 and 8.93 or within 1% of the standard 8.92.

None of the wartime silver nickels are giving SG within 1% of the 9.25 I'm told should be the standard SG of a wartime nickel.

My methodology has proven reasonably accurate. What's wrong with this picture?

Specific Gravity is proving to be inconclusive.
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 Posted 02/23/2020  6:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add macmercury to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I know this may not be accurate, how about a drop test? A few inches above on a hard surface. It should have the same tone as the regular silver War Nickel, if it is the same metal alloy.

I did try it on the coins pictured, its not like a mint state coin that I would be worry about effecting the grade and value.

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Valued Member
United States
77 Posts
 Posted 02/24/2020  8:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ShineOn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Were there any known annealing errors in 1946 nickels? It does kind-of look similar to later Jefferson nickels struck on planchets with annealing errors.

I don't think it's from post-mint heating or living through a fire... but what do I know?
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