Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Newbie Question: What If One Side Of A Coin Is More Worn Than The Other?

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 13 / Views: 463Next Topic  
Valued Member
United States
389 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2021  2:27 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Nells250 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
NEWBIE QUESTION: What if one side of a coin is more worn than the other?

How does that effect grading?

I can imagine a coin being in, say, a car for decades. The side against carpet is relatively safe from "shmoo" over the years, but the other side is being attacked by sand, grit, liquids, feet, mechanics, even pets.

Fast forward, and someone finds said coin and discovers it is a gold Columbiaburbiaville $3 Half-Nelson coin worth a fortune and sends it in to get professionally graded.

The carpet side looks almost mint, but the other side looks like El Crapola.

What is the coin grader to do?

Am I just being over-imaginative, or does this actually happen with valuable coins?

Valued Member
404 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2021  2:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add norantyki to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The coin would receive a details grade. The details letter range should be determined by the weaker side, or the TPG might throw up their arms and send it back in a body bag.

In general, old SPINK catalogs address this issue directly, and advise grading both sides, which is why British-sold coins are sometimes found with split grades. Otherwise, if the discrepancy isn't too large, it is advised to go by the slightly weaker side.
Edited by norantyki
02/25/2021 2:33 pm
Valued Member
United States
389 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2021  2:38 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nells250 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
send it back in a body bag.



Quote:
which is why British-sold coins are sometimes found with split grades.
AHA, so I am not being too imaginative!
Moderator
Learn More...
Australia
13583 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2021  7:04 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
ANACS used to do split grading too, way back when they were first founded. I think it was PCGS entering the TPG market int he 1980s with a single grade or "net grading" that saw ANACS stop that practice.

Yes, it is possible for a coin that is worn more on one side than the other to be legitimately graded (ie. not returned with a details grade). The convention is that the obverse of a coin contributes 80% of the net grade. So if a coin is low VF on the obverse and low EF on the reverse, it will net-grade in the EF or perhaps high VF range; if an otherwise identical coin is low VF on the obverse and low EF on the reverse, that coin will end up with a low VF grade.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4581 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2021  8:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
British-sold coins are sometimes found with split grades.


Polish, too. I recently won a coin graded VF/VF-.
Pillar of the Community
United States
2374 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2021  10:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Arkie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
You mean like this?


Pillar of the Community
United States
1077 Posts
 Posted 02/25/2021  10:49 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dearborn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Or like this poor quarter...



Collecting since 1972. Learning from then on
"Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn." -Benjamin Franklin
My Dansco 7070 type set coin count: 31/76
My Dansco 8176 Eisenhower set coin count: 36/36
Valued Member
404 Posts
 Posted 02/26/2021  02:37 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add norantyki to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@tdziemia - some of the old boys certainly do :)
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
4581 Posts
 Posted 02/26/2021  07:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tdziemia to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Or like this poor quarter...


Yikes no! That's body bag material. No grade.

Valued Member
United States
389 Posts
 Posted 02/26/2021  3:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nells250 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
YIKES those photos are almost what I was thinking! Actually... WORSE!

I wasn't sure about if one side was more important than the other, but knowing MOST people look at he front BUT knowing there are "two sides to every coin" I wasn't sure.

Obviously, any collectible with imperfection to one area has far less value, BUT knowing that there are some very rare coins out there I was curious just how much people can overlook.
Valued Member
United States
389 Posts
 Posted 03/05/2021  4:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nells250 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
HEY FOLKS, I just accidentally ran into this Ebay listing and decided to share because of the 1941 half dollar... notice the back is either totally missing or worn away!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Set-of-4-C...373472876189

I'll be the Devil's Advocate and say that coin like this fits into this topic because I want to know more about it AND how, if it is an error, HOW do ERROR coins with different-grade sides get handled by graders? Once a coin moves into "error" territory, do "good sides" still factor into any sort of grade?
Valued Member
United States
123 Posts
 Posted 03/05/2021  4:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add halfamind to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm going to venture a guess it was glued onto a surface at some point. It may have been sanded beforehand to create a better bond. You'd want to check the weight (if you bought it) to see how much silver is missing.
Bedrock of the Community
United States
20180 Posts
 Posted 03/06/2021  2:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Imagine a coin graded as MS-60/G-4
just carl
Valued Member
United States
389 Posts
 Posted 03/06/2021  2:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nells250 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Imagine a coin graded as MS-60/G-4


WOW you are generous!
  Previous TopicReplies: 13 / Views: 463Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.62 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05