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Acetone

 
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Pillar of the Community
United States
6079 Posts
 Posted 05/10/2013  7:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Earle42 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Serves me right for typing with a headache!


Quote:
My wife also just found a bottle of 110% pyre acetone at Dollar General. It cost 1.75 - inexpensive stuff.


One hundred and ten percent combustible material?

Well... it is very flammable

Lets try that again...

My wife also just found a bottle of 100% pure acetone at Dollar General. It cost 1.75 - inexpensive stuff.


- When I value " being right" more than what IS right, I am then right...a fool.
- How much squash could a Sasquatch squash if a Sasquatch would squash squash?
- Real men play Fizzbin.
Pillar of the Community
United States
2542 Posts
 Posted 05/10/2013  10:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Circus to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If it is sold as finger nail polish remover, and has any coloring, or aroma scent in it then it will have some additives that will leave a residue behind. You can not have 100% if there are any additives in the product. The Chinese ad people and manufactures have the same problem the the ad people do here in the US stretching the truth.

You can only have acetone listed in the ingredients list on the container.
Pillar of the Community
United States
6079 Posts
 Posted 05/11/2013  9:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Earle42 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here is the Wal-Mart bottle and the Dollar General bottle.




There are no colors or aromas added to either. This is why I mentioned them.

However, I also just read the label on the Dollar General bottle and see where they added Denatonium Benzoate (the chemical added to products to make them tatset very bitter so people will not drink them).

Did some reading and made an edit. The Denatonium is said to be the most bitter substance known, and therefore is used in quantities of only 10 parts per million(!) making its host liquid more bitter than people can tolerate.

I also read the definition of "pure" acetone allows for 5000 parts per million of unknown chemical. So the incredibly small amount of the Denatonium used is a moot point since it is very well within tolerance levels pure acetone acetone to be called pure.
- When I value " being right" more than what IS right, I am then right...a fool.
- How much squash could a Sasquatch squash if a Sasquatch would squash squash?
- Real men play Fizzbin.
Edited by Earle42
05/11/2013 10:06 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
7526 Posts
 Posted 05/12/2013  10:44 am  Show Profile   Check 52Raymo's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 52Raymo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's a lot cheaper than hardware dept's. that's for sure. I don't know, I was always told here to stay away from the nail polish remover acetone.
Oregon coin geek.....*** GO BEAVS ! ! ! ***
Pillar of the Community
United States
6079 Posts
 Posted 05/12/2013  3:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Earle42 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
As circus said - you stay away from them if they have aroma or coloring added. The aroma and colorings can leave a residue. So it is right to be cautious and read the contents of the bottle.

But 100% acetone is 100% acetone whether the label on the bottle says to use it as nail polish or paint remover.

The only difference is the wrapper b/c the same chemical can be marketed for different uses.


- When I value " being right" more than what IS right, I am then right...a fool.
- How much squash could a Sasquatch squash if a Sasquatch would squash squash?
- Real men play Fizzbin.
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76103 Posts
 Posted 05/13/2013  11:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
But 100% acetone is 100% acetone whether the label on the bottle says to use it as nail polish or paint remover.
Easy to verify. Pour some into a clean, glass dish and let it evaporate. If there is a residue left behind, the label is a lie.
Pillar of the Community
United States
7526 Posts
 Posted 05/13/2013  2:28 pm  Show Profile   Check 52Raymo's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 52Raymo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There you go...time for a test. With pics please !
Oregon coin geek.....*** GO BEAVS ! ! ! ***
Pillar of the Community
United States
6079 Posts
 Posted 05/13/2013  7:35 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Earle42 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Already been using the Walmart acetone on coins for awhile now - no residue I have been able to tell/see (and I use a glass furniture coaster as my "bowl" to soak them in. Will have to try the Dollar General stuff soon. Might be a few days.
- When I value " being right" more than what IS right, I am then right...a fool.
- How much squash could a Sasquatch squash if a Sasquatch would squash squash?
- Real men play Fizzbin.
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 Posted 05/14/2013  2:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Already been using the Walmart acetone on coins for awhile now - no residue I have been able to tell/see
Good to know.
Pillar of the Community
United States
5034 Posts
 Posted 08/03/2013  4:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jack jeckel to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Just saw this on the ANACS site. They actually tell you to use Acetone to remove PVC damage so if anyone ever gets a coin back that they soaked in acetone before sending in to the for grading that comes back altered or cleaned (when it wasn't)

http://www.anacs.com/(A(zHjeIB_HzgE...ervices.aspx

What is PVC residue?
PVC residue is a surface contaminant that may be caused by storing a coin in a soft, pliable vinyl flip. The amount of time a coin needs to reside in a vinyl flip before the PVC film develops will vary significantly, depending on temperature, humidity, the age of the flip, and the type of coin. Under optimal conditions, PVC residue can begin to form in as little as two weeks. At ANACS, we only use Mylar flips. Mylar flips are free of all PVC.

The composition of a coin is a strong factor with the formation of PVC residue.

A gold or platinum coin will be the most resistant, a silver coin is next, and a copper or copper-nickel coin will be the most susceptible. Copper and copper-nickel coins are also highly susceptible to corrosion and/or spotting from excessive moisture and high emperatures. Due to this, collectors need to be extra careful with their choices of storage materials for these coins.

During the manufacturing process for soft vinyl flips, an agent is added to increase pliability. The main reason for this is to allow the flips to be reused without breaking or tearing. This softening agent will migrate out of the plastic over time, and becomes the surface film that is called "PVC Residue." As this film continues to degrade, it eventually turns into a mild acid, and begins to attack the surface of the coin. Until the film is removed from the coin, it is usually not possible to tell if the coin has been damaged. Additionally, this chemical reaction can continue even if the coin is sealed in an inert plastic holder. This is why ANACS does not encapsulate coins with active PVC contamination.

Recognizing PVC residue is not always easy. When the residue begins to form, it often appears as light milky spots on the coin. PVC residue also appears as streaks or a light haze, and ranges from nearly white to dark green or gray. If the coin has enough ontamination, and your sense of smell is good, you will detect an odor that imitates the smell of a new plastic shower curtain.

For most coins, removal of PVC residue is a simple process. Gold, platinum and silver coins are easier to decontaminate than copper and copper-nickel coins, and business strikes are easier than Proof coins, but as with any coin, proper caution must be utilized. Pure acetone is the best solvent for PVC residue removal, and like many solvents, acetone must be handled properly in a controlled environment.

When using acetone, proper ventilation is a necessity, and extended exposure is not recommended. Wearing chemical-resistant gloves and eye protection is a good precaution against accidental acetone contact with your skin or eyes. You also need to avoid any type of open flame or spark, as acetone is highly flammable. If you are uncomfortable with these types of procedures, it is recommended that you make use of a PVC removal service to decontaminate your coins.

Pour a small amount of pure acetone (the kind you can purchase in the paint section of a hardware or home improvement store) into a small glass or metal container. Acetone can eat through plastic, so using a plastic container is not recommended. With light PVC residue, gently swishing the coin back and forth in the acetone while holding the coin with a gloved hand will often remove the residue. Let the coin air dry afterwards on a soft cloth to avoid damaging the coin's surfaces, and then inspect carefully.

With heavier residue, or contamination that has been on the coin for more than a month or two, more effort will be required. In these instances, the use of Q-tips can handle the residue. Begin by soaking the head of a Q-tip in the acetone, then carefully roll the head of the Q-tip across the surface of the coin. Make sure that the head of the Q-tip stays wet, as a dry Q-tip could scratch the coin. Continue to work the surfaces of the coin for about 15 seconds or so, then inspect the head of the Q-tip. If the process is working, you should see a green, gray or brown discoloration on the cotton tip.

Throw the first Q-tip away, and repeat the process with a second Q-tip. Continue until the head of the Q-tip remains white after working the surface of the coin. Once this happens, turn the coin over and perform the same operation on the other side. After all visible PVC residue has been removed, and the Q-tip stays clean, place the coin on a clean, soft cloth and let it air dry. You can also give the coin a few light swishes through the acetone, to remove any remaining traces.

As with any restoration process, proper care must be used at all times to prevent damage to the coin's surfaces. Experiment with low-value coins first to familiarize yourself with the process. Done correctly, using pure acetone to remove PVC residue will not harm the surfaces of a coin, but if performed improperly, you could end up with a hairlined or otherwise damaged example
Edited by jack jeckel
08/03/2013 4:53 pm
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 Posted 08/03/2013  4:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add SsuperDdave to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good on them for publicizing something any capable numismatist should know. It lends credence to the process.
Valued Member
United States
177 Posts
 Posted 08/16/2013  08:01 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add papermoney to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I don't even clean my coins at all, unless soaking a corroded coin in olive oil every year or two.
Bedrock of the Community
United States
18416 Posts
 Posted 08/16/2013  10:51 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
My wife also just found a bottle of 110% pyre acetone at Dollar General. It cost 1.75 - inexpensive stuff.

One of my favorite replies to this post. My grandaughter always says things like that. This is 200% pure Ice Creame. Or stuff like that.
As already replied, always test the Acetone your using by simply placing osme on a clean glass dish. Allow to evaporate. If any residue, it's contaminated and should be discarded.
just carl
Edited by just carl
08/16/2013 10:54 am
Valued Member
United States
95 Posts
 Posted 08/16/2013  1:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ctguy to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another place to fine Acetone is in your local auto parts supply store in the body paint aisle, that's were I got mine.

Oh.. and I just use my fingers when adding and removing my coins from the glass dish, you know what they say no pain no gain.... Oh no, I hope people don't think Acetone causes pain now
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 Posted 08/16/2013  3:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add SsuperDdave to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Oh no, I hope people don't think Acetone causes pain now


If you let it get into an open sore, you'll know pain.
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