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What Does RPD, MPD And OD Mean? Part Two:

 
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 Posted 09/23/2016  1:23 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Part two:

But this still leaves the RPD term and the MPDs? What are they? On the RPD (Re-Punched-Date) I mention the practice of adding the date digits to the dies. These were done with single digits and sometimes they were added together on what is called a gang punch. But until 1909 these were added by hand on the dies. So when you look at the earlier dies you will notice this, but also on the ' Indian Head cents' you can see them. These devices added to the individual dies were sometimes slightly different. Because they were hand punched they might be slightly over/above/below/to the left or to the right of the desired digit. When the changes were made to correct this, the first punching maybe left on the die, but not raised as much the final punching location. When the digits were re-punched on the same years digits, this is called a RPD. (Re-Punched-Date) This is not a catalog of all of these, but I ran into some images of different ones that are cataloged by FS numbers (listed in the ' Cherry Pickers Guide'). Why is this important? Well the PCGS team use the catalog numbers from this publication for identification of their die numbers they attribute from their site. I also found a few from 'Rick Snow's' listings. So while this is not a complete list, you can see what is going on with RPDs. So lets get started. This is mainly concerning the ' Indian Head cent' series.

The first example of the 'Indian Head' cent design with the RPDs is on the first year. 1859.
Snow-1

This one is a full date RPD with each digit being punched over another all 4 digits. Although not as strong as you might have expected, the digits are slightly affected on the left side of the date digits. (note the arrows) This one is considered Snow # 1 Each Snow number starts there and continues. When the date changes then they start all over again from there.
But here is Snow-2. (a small image)

The RPD shows the '85' digits, affected slightly downwards. Keep in mind the images are larger on most of these, so you can click on the image and it will enlarge them. I make all of my images larger for this purpose.
1860: FS-401
Snow-1

On this one you will see that three of the digits are affected on this RPD. Again this is not a complete listing, but just to help you get started on finding these. On this one it is marked Snow-1 and FS-401. It is the same die, but with two different sources identifications.
1861:
This one is listed as FS-301 and S-1. I just realized the 'S-1' is probably the Snow number 1 that we will see on the other die attributions.

It looks like the 1 on the end of the date doesn't have a base at the bottom of the digit on the RPD. They must have more than one style of punch for the 1's? The last two digits are mainly affected.
1863:
Snow-1

Snow-2 FS-301

1964
Snow-1 FS-2301


Snow-2 FS-2305

Snow-4 FS-2303

Snow-5 FS-2304

1865
Snow-2

Snow-3 FS-303

Snow-4 FS-302
https://imgs.inkfrog.com/pix/coop49...__BN_AAA.jpg
1866:
Snow-2 FS-301

Snow-3 FS-302

Snow-9 FS-303

1867:
Snow-1 FS-301

Snow-4 FS-302

1868:
No ID on this one:

1869:
Snow-1 FS-302


Snow-3

Snow-4 FS-303

1870:
FS-301

1873:
Snow-1 'Open 3'

1875:
Snow-1 FS-301

Snow-2 FS-302

1888:
Snow-2 FS-302

1889:
FS-301

1893:
Snow-2 FS-301

Snow-6

1894:
ID not certain.

1895:
Snow-1 FS-301

Snow-9

1896:
Snow-1 FS-301

Snow-23

1897
Snow-8 FS-402

1899:
Snow-1 FS-301

Snow-13 FS-302

1900:
Snow-1 FS-301

Snow-3 FS-302

1906
Snow-7 FS-301

1907:
Snow-1 FS-301

Snow-2 FS-302

So far we have identified that OD meant Over Date. The deliberate placing of a different year digit over a different year. The term RPD to identify a digit that was punched over the same years digit showing a miss-alignment. Now what about a MPD? This stands for 'Mis-Punched-Date.' I prefer a different term as it makes it easier to remember. 'Mis-Placed-Date' as it identifies what happed to that die keeps it easier to remeber. So my images show this as a separate tag on these images. The mint mark punch was hammered in a place on the wrong area of the die. This could be on the bust, or on the denticals. They are intersting to find, but sometimes harder to see. So studying the locations of some of them, it will help you in your search. So here we go.

MPD
1870:
Snow-5 FS-102

Note on this one you see it in the denticles where the arrow is pointing. Hard to see at first isn't it?
FS-302

1882:
Snow-6

Note on this one, you can see part of the 1 on the bust on the pearls? (arrows helps a lot on these)
1883:
Snow-1 FS-403

Snow 7 FS-402

1884:
Snow-1 FS-401

1890:
S-1 FS-401

1894
Snow-2

1897:
Snow-1 FS-401



Same die from a two different sites. The most unusual MPD?
1898
Snow-5 FS-402


Again same die number, from a different source.
1908:
Snow 4 FS-301

Ok, by now your totally bored? But I wanted to show you perhaps a new variety to search for by new ones. Better images of the ones I found on line that advanced collectors might appreciate. But know the terms again:
OD = Over Date (A different digit was intentionally altered by the mint to continue to use a die until it was retired)
RPD = Re-Punched-Date (helps us to understand that these devices were hand punched into the dies themselves and were sometimes miss punched over each other or moved to a more correct location) These were always the same year the die was made.
MPD=Mis-Punched-Date (The one I call Mis-Placed-Date as that term to me tells me that this was not the location intended for this to happen was not where it landed. Its a long read, but with great images it helps us to visualize these varieties a lot better.

Click Here for part one.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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 Posted 09/23/2016  3:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bpoc1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Coop. a wealth of information.
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 Posted 09/23/2016  7:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wadahek to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you Coop!! I love learning new error information!
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 Posted 09/24/2016  01:05 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Well I found a site that have very large images. (Almost 6,000 pixel wide for obv and rev images together) So being the creative type I decided to use these images for this presentation. The images for these are usually quite small and poor in quality. So I made these.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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 Posted 09/24/2016  07:56 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dustin6 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great info. Just saved this to my files too. Thanks!!
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 Posted 02/14/2017  08:38 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add whoppy1968 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Anyone ever heard of the 1873 (MPD) Indian Head cent - OPEN 3 (SNOW-7)?
I have one in AU or better condition.
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 Posted 02/17/2017  6:35 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Rpuckett to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you for the tutorial! This has been such an informative guide for me as I have only been viewing coins for 5 months.
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 Posted 02/18/2017  08:42 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very Interesting. Would make for a great book.
just carl
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 Posted 01/27/2019  12:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add j0b to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Coop. You're always a wealth of knowledge. Found this guy while cataloging my IHP, now I have to find a regular 1897
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 Posted 01/27/2019  2:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kbbpll to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting that this thread got reopened - I was just about to post a RPD and a possible MPD. Two points/questions. Didn't the mints punch/anneal/punch/anneal/punch/anneal i.e. a repetition that was standard practice? Also, on the MPDs, Bowers in his Red Book on Barber silver says "They are believed to have been caused when the workman about to enter the date logotype touched it lightly on the edge of the die to evaluate the hardness of the metal". I'm not sure if that's true or not but I get a kick out of it - "I'll just tap it over here where nobody will notice". (Bowers' book repeats this MPD explanation in the dime, quarter, and half chapters).
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 Posted 01/27/2019  7:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ItchyN to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice article. I thought I'd add that RPDs, OVDs, and MPDs can all be considerably more dramatic than the posted examples. Here are examples from Shield nickels.

1866/1866 RPD:


1883/2 OVD:


Wildly misplaced MPD:
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 Posted 01/15/2020  11:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1883 no Cents overdate:
https://imgs.inkfrog.com/pix/coop49...301_P1.1.jpg



CoopHome : RPD mean OD
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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 Posted 02/09/2020  9:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Clash-Act to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Your knowledge base is off the charts!
Thank you for this informative post.
I really appreciate the section on MPD or Mispunched Dates.
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