Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Imp Vespasian T Caesar IIIi Gold Coin Information

 
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
New Member

Bosnia And Herzegovina
3 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  08:25 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add MrRango to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi to everyone,

I'm new member on this forum, registered hoping to get some information about ancient gold coin that friend of mine got somewhere years ago. I did some research and found little information about it, just some basics.
I'm hoping to get some information, direction where I can get some more info or estimated value of this coin.
Found this site about this coin: http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/sear5/s2415.html

Sorry for my bad grammar


Edited by MrRango
01/02/2019 08:26 am
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
4129 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  09:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Ben to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


A gold coin from the Balkans area is always a concern in terms of authenticity. The design looks okay and it doesn't look cast, but really you'd need a professional opinion concerning any gold in such a situation.
Edited by Ben
01/02/2019 09:36 am
New Member
Bosnia And Herzegovina
3 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  10:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MrRango to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Yeah I know I should find a proffesional who can confirm authenticity, but I'm from Balkan in Europe, and there's no many proffesionals to find...
But I'm wondering how I can't find it anywhere on web, only on 2-3 places find it.
And what do you mean by "coin from Balkan area", does it mean it was used usually on that region, not in entire empire. I dont have any knowledge about this subject...
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
71027 Posts
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
4129 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  10:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Ben to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Gold being as valuable as it is, people were much more careful with it. If a coin was only produced for a short time, only a single example might have survived to the modern day. Examples from hoards tend to make their way to museums instead of the internet, unlike hoards of copper coins.

The problem with coins from the Balkans area is that most of the highly skilled forgers of the modern day are there. Many people find themselves caught out by highly accurate coins produced in the last 20 years in the area. The quality and quantity of the balkan fakes is unmatched. The coins arent necessarily from that area - the workshops will produce and sell coins from far flung places that could never have circulated locally.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
22288 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  12:09 pm  Show Profile   Check echizento's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add echizento to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to the community

From the photos the coin appears to be genuine, however as Ben pointed out at part of the world are suspect. The only way to tell for sure is to take the coin to and expert for examination.
Valued Member
Canada
122 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  12:13 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Loruca to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm not completely convinced by it, and would not buy such a coin myself.
However I would not completely rule it out as being real.
New Member
Bosnia And Herzegovina
3 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  12:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add MrRango to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It has been brought to some jewelery stores, and they've said yes it's gold, but not sure about history behind it, and they adviced not to sell it before doing some research. But unfortunately we don't have many experts in out area to get more info.
I'm gona try reach some musseums to get in contact for more info.

Just in curiosity, what do you think is estimated value of this coin, or what are approximate value coins similar to this.
Again, sorry for my bad grammar if I wrote something wrong.
Thanks anyway for responses and provided info.
Valued Member
United States
485 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  12:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add travelcoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Coins that are obvious fakes can be spotted easily by photos. Well crafted fakes - not so much. Point being, your coin is not an obvious fake (IMHO). A coin of this value should be examined in hand by a professional.

Just an FYI - many times in Wildwinds if you click on "Text" it will tell you what is last sold for.

In this case: last bid was $2,125.00 / Year 1999

However, it didn't sell?


Edited by travelcoin
01/02/2019 12:48 pm
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
4129 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  12:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Ben to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Probably worth a couple thousand pounds on the international market. This example is at auction right now, starting 1500:



Yours is finer than it though.

A warning: export laws in the Balkans in general are strict. The highest prices will be found on the open market, but you might find it hard to do. A museum should be able to authenticate it and let you know about the laws that concern it.
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
15273 Posts
 Posted 01/02/2019  5:33 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I agree with everything that Ben has said.

A jewelry store is not the right place to authenticate this coin.

The obvious place to take this coin to for authentication is the
National Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina, (in Serajevo).
To help with authentication, they will probably ask you to supply what previous history you can about it.
For a coin collector, provenance IS important.

If genuine, I would think that the Museum itself would be happy to add it to their collection, and pay you a reasonable amount of money for it.

If the museum is happy NOT to need the coin, and you have complied with all of the Laws of your Country, you are then in a position to apply to your Government for permission to sell it on the open international market.
As such, this coin may command a price of $10,000 or upwards.
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
11124 Posts
 Posted 01/03/2019  9:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@MrR, first welcome to CCF. Second, with regard to your comment:


Quote:
It has been brought to some jewelery stores, and they've said yes it's gold


I see one potential method for better determining fake vs. real. Since the refining methods for gold have changed in the past 2000 years, you could at least see if this coin has an impurity profile that is consistent with its age. A local university or museum might have the appropriate, non-destructive equipment.
"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
15273 Posts
 Posted 01/03/2019  10:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Some commercial scrap gold buyers have hand held XRF instruments, but the OP does not indicate if XRF was used or not.
Valued Member
Canada
167 Posts
 Posted 01/04/2019  11:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add AlRashid to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I was once told by a museum expert that there is a method similar to carbon 14 that works for ancient gold. They measure the thorium residue in ancient gold and determine the age of it but this examination can be done in highly equipped labs and the cost is around 3000 dollars per coin. If a coin worth more than 20000 I would do this test for it to be sure it is authentic. Here is article that discusses this method:

https://journals.openedition.org/ar...ciences/2017
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
15273 Posts
 Posted 01/05/2019  12:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
X- Ray Florescence (XRF) will give you results in a similar way that atomic mass spectrometry does.

Only that use of a cheap hand held XRF instrument needs only a few dollars in fees. (less than $10?). I have free access to an XRF instrument.
Any commercial scrap gold buyer worth his salt should have a hand held XRF instrument.

What XRF does, is to aim a non destructive X-ray beam at the surface of the coin, them analyse the X-ray scatter pattern, which is different for each element.
The result yields the percentages of each element that are found in the X-ray scatter pattern.
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2019 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2019 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.98 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05