Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

What Creates A Fin On A Coin? What Is A Fin?

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 15 / Views: 1,247Next Topic  
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
44587 Posts
 Posted 02/07/2019  6:57 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
What creates a fin on a coin?
No this is not a thread about fish, or a swim fin, but a fin on a coin. LOL
I know this information is on the images also. But they can point you in the right direction when your figuring what this is. So lets look at some example to see what they are first.
Fins can be strong, but most of the time they are thin looking and flatten very easily. Here is a strong one:

Here is the normal type you'll usually find:











So this sounded like it was going to be a tough subject. But with explanations and images and simulations, it makes it a lot easier to under stand. Just keep the ones with the thin fin and the strong ones that appear they have not been flattened. Most of these will probably not be keeper, but keep on the look out for the good ones.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
26753 Posts
 Posted 02/07/2019  7:01 pm  Show Profile   Check Errers and Varietys's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Errers and Varietys to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Good demonstration Coop! It was pretty easy to understand.
More information about Die Deterioration? http://goccf.com/t/317950
Retired U.S. Mint Coin Die Set information. http://goccf.com/t/302961
Machine Doubling Tutorial. http://goccf.com/t/332421
Die states progression on coins. Scroll down, so you can see the different die state progressions. http://goccf.com/t/325638
Die Deterioration Doubling Tutorial. http://goccf.com/t/336470
Split Plate Doubling Tutorial. http://goccf.com/t/357614
Pillar of the Community
United States
1143 Posts
 Posted 02/07/2019  7:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add cookiemonster to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
3728 Posts
 Posted 02/07/2019  7:48 pm  Show Profile   Check chafemasterj's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add chafemasterj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank You!
Check out my counterstamped Lincoln Cent collection:
http://goccf.com/t/303507
Pillar of the Community
United States
965 Posts
 Posted 02/07/2019  7:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add thisistheshow to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This is much appreciated!
Pillar of the Community
United States
1680 Posts
 Posted 02/07/2019  8:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add aristarchus123 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Very helpful post! Thanks.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1224 Posts
 Posted 02/08/2019  02:58 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add owatchman to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you for the knowledge!
Pillar of the Community
United States
749 Posts
 Posted 02/08/2019  2:52 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Panther to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Will it also create a thin coin at the opposite side from the fin, or a weak strike on the same side as the fin ?

Dan
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
44587 Posts
 Posted 02/08/2019  3:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm not sure on that, but that thought came by me when I created this thread. But if you look at a roll of tube cents, that would explain why so many are thinner on one side.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Edited by coop
02/09/2019 01:10 am
Pillar of the Community
United States
2143 Posts
 Posted 02/09/2019  5:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Halo1st to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Coop as always well explained cause and effect concerning rim fins.

Adding more food for thought. After researching rim anomilies some time back. It seems I often see the rim fin and folded rin fin description misused for other causes showing a doubled (sometimes more) rim. I'm under the impression rim fins fall into the double and false rim category. Other causes can produce a somewhat similar effect. https://www.coinworld.com/news/us-c...tances.html#

One effect thats kept me pondering is the collar clash. More specifically a die clash with a non reeded collar. When a reeded collar clash is present, its seems to be raised on the coin and visually evident. When a non-reeded collar clash is present it visually resembles a raised fin. You rarely if ever see collar clash mentioned when a non-reeded collar was in use. Unless major die attrition is evident its typically labeled a fin.

Another thing to keep in mind is Wide Collar issues. This results in a larger than normal gap between the die(s) and collar as well. http://www.error-ref.com/wide-collar/

Quote:
Will it also create a thin coin at the opposite side from the fin, or a weak strike on the same side as the fin ?

When a coin seems abnormally thin or thick, I give it a bit more attention. US Cents are notorious for fluctuation in thickness. Modern day cents specs should be 1.52mm thick, but sometimes even the rolling of the stock material can fluctuate in thickness and show a difference from one edge to the other on the end product. Thanks, Doug.
Second opinions are always recommended. Rookies thoughts!
Two sides to every coin. The edge makes three.
Side Note: Sometimes I feel like a nut, sometimes I don't.
Edited by Halo1st
02/09/2019 5:09 pm
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
44587 Posts
 Posted 02/09/2019  8:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
On the collar clashes, the die outer edge touches the collar. Leaving those lines on the die. When coins are struck, the damaged outside edge of the die leaves the lines on the rim area of the strike:
http://www.error-ref.com/collar-clash/
Check out the images a ways down. You can see the damage on the outside edge of the die
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Pillar of the Community
United States
2143 Posts
 Posted 02/09/2019  8:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Halo1st to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Side note of my trying to describe a non-reeded collar clash. Seems only reeded collar clash examples get illustrated. http://www.error-ref.com/collar-clash/ Thanks, Doug.
Second opinions are always recommended. Rookies thoughts!
Two sides to every coin. The edge makes three.
Side Note: Sometimes I feel like a nut, sometimes I don't.
Edited by Halo1st
02/09/2019 8:43 pm
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
44587 Posts
 Posted 02/09/2019  8:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If the dies are run to long with the die rubbing on the outside edge, it wears the edge off and creates attrition.
]http://www.error-ref.com/?s=attrition

Note how the rim is moved closer to the devices?















CoopHome : Creates Fin
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Edited by coop
02/09/2019 9:12 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
2143 Posts
 Posted 02/09/2019  9:59 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Halo1st to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I eluded to die attrition in my previous reply. That seems to be a definitive collar issue regardless if it stems from a non-reeded collar or a reeded collar die wear issues. Some examples suggest a potential raised rim fin as well.

What if a non-reeded collar clashed with a die occurred or was initiated prior to the major die attrition stage? To me it would seem to results in a raised impression along the periphery of the working dies design rim. Hence another potential looking rim fin. Thanks, Doug.
Second opinions are always recommended. Rookies thoughts!
Two sides to every coin. The edge makes three.
Side Note: Sometimes I feel like a nut, sometimes I don't.
Edited by Halo1st
02/09/2019 11:09 pm
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
86522 Posts
New Member
United States
12 Posts
 Posted 02/10/2019  2:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Shirley Lodge to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, very informative description.
  Previous TopicReplies: 15 / Views: 1,247Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.

Coin Community Member eBay Sales

Certified Coins   Certified VAMs   Certified Errors  




Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.97 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05