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Question. Why Are Some Pennies Just Better Than Others Of The Same Year?

 
 
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Pillar of the Community
United States
692 Posts
 Posted 06/17/2019  1:01 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Big-Kingdom to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I was roll hunting cents this weekend and came across a 1991 with a really uniform lip around the edge, very squared, well centered, just really caught my eye, then I found a couple more that have like no lip to it and the edge is sort of rounded and average.

I will take pictures and post them but figured I'd ask without pictures because I'm sure every roll hunter has come across them from time to time it's not the first I've seen ever just rare to see them in my opinion in rolls.

Is there an explaination, like first strike with the die collar, or maybe struck for a mint set? Something like that?

I don't think it's an error or even valuable, just a circulated coin that caught my eye and wondering about them in general. The edge is like what I'd expect to see on a proof penny for instance if that makes sense.

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United States
40349 Posts
 Posted 06/17/2019  1:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Pictures will help!

Edited by Coinfrog
06/17/2019 1:35 pm
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 Posted 06/17/2019  4:04 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add cladking to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Some coins are well struck by good dies and some are poorly struck from awful dies.

Dies can be worn, misaligned, and operated under very low pressure.
Time don't fly, it bounds and leaps.
Edited by cladking
06/17/2019 4:05 pm
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 Posted 06/17/2019  9:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Big-Kingdom to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
OK here's a couple pictures, like I said I'm sure it's nothing special or valuable, just wondering about why it is.
On the 3rd picture it's the coin in the center, the one on the left and right are two other 1991 P. Sorry they are blurry, but I think you can get the gist of what I'm getting at.



Edited by Big-Kingdom
06/18/2019 08:57 am
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United States
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 Posted 06/18/2019  12:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add n9jig to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
When a die is new it stands to reason that the first batch of coins it strikes are usually better defined and appear nicer, as the die is used it wears and subsequent coins start losing their definition and appearance suffers.

In daily use the coins start getting worn as well. Many coins are used just once and tossed in a jar, sometimes for years. When they get cashed in they reenter circulation and may appear in as good condition (or even better then current coins.

Lastly, in years past coins were made in much lower numbers and with higher relief than as is done now. Coins are made in such higher numbers that the relief is almost nil, this leads to lower definition and less attractive coins but many more can be made at lower cost and higher speeds.
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 Posted 06/18/2019  1:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Big-Kingdom to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
So then, this would likely be a well circulated "first strike" in the real sense,(new die pair, new collar) and not by a confirmed bought date on a grading slab designation?

I've thought this could be the case for them appearing, also maybe a pressure issue on the press, or one of the San fancisco minted coins without mint marks they would do, done on their vertical presses at proof settings maybe, or even a coin that might have come from a mint set at some point.

I've found ones like this over the years of different dates, but not many at all compared to the amount of cents I see with soft rims and edges.The amount of circulation a coin sees doesn't really explain it completely. I've seen many BU 2019 cents that are less defined edges and rims than this 1991.

The "1" is pretty weak on it also which isn't uncommon for 1991 either so I don't think that's anything special either.

Just it stands out among its peers and wondering why it does.

Thank you for your thought's on it.
Edited by Big-Kingdom
06/18/2019 1:10 pm
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 Posted 06/18/2019  1:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Tunnioc to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The obverse die is slightly MAD. It missed some of the proto-rim, and may be thicker there.
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 Posted 06/20/2019  5:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Kopper Ken to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Basic factors would be the die used, die wear, first/end strike, planchet quality.

KK
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