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Your Opinion Please. The Palladium Mercury Dime From The Mint?

 
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Valued Member
United States
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 Posted 09/13/2019  4:21 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add johnstac to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Your Opinion Please. The Palladium Mercury Dime From The Mint?
2019 September 13

I know stuff from the mint is never an investment. I get that. This American eagle palladium Mercury themed coin looks beautiful to me. I like the coin. My question is, how big of a hit will I take buying it? I'm in my 50s so this is a coin that will likely be put away for the kids later. I've never bought anything palladium. I've barely even heard of it. I just want to know if it will ever be worth what I pay for it. Looks like about $2000. Opinions?

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 Posted 09/13/2019  4:59 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add hfjacinto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's nice but at $2k, way above my comfort spending. At the $2k pricepoint there a few other coins I would consider like some ms 65 key dates or gold coins. If you really want a nice coin get a MS Mercury dime. If you really want the palladium coin get it but as with all speculative investments you can lose money or make it. No one has a crystal
Ball so buy it if you like it but not as an investment.
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 Posted 09/13/2019  5:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add moxking to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I saw the Mints notice this morning too.

As an investment, it's really terrible. If you love the look (I do too) it's perfectly fine to buy because you do love it. But I'm guessing it will be many years to hit the value spent.

You could buy some killer Mercury dimes for $2000.

Last year, in 2018 only, you would have needed to spend $36,550 to purchase one of everything the mint sold. It's very unlikely that any collector did that.

The mint has been flooding the market. If collectors can't afford to buy all they offer when it is issued, how many will try to put together a full set of palladium coins?

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 Posted 09/13/2019  5:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
You could buy some killer Mercury dimes for $2000.
Yup. One can also can finish off a decent 7070 for that.
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Canada
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 Posted 09/13/2019  5:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add oriole to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A big chunk of that $2000 is due to the high price of Palladium. The price of Palladium is quite volatile, due to its use in the auto industry, and we currently are at a high point.

So consider this as more of an investment in Palladium-very risky. Maybe it will go higher, but how would you feel if the price of palladium dropped to 1/3 of its current value, which is certainly quite possible in a few years? Gold and numismatic coins are far less risky.
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 Posted 09/13/2019  5:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add moxking to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A good point. Palladium has been hovering between $1550-1600 per ounce recently. So you would be paying between $400-450 for the numismatic value.

That might make it easier to justify
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 Posted 09/13/2019  5:54 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sasquatch to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Gold, Platinum, and Silver spot prices are much closer to the bullion coin prices.
I see PF 69 Palladium Ultra Cameos for sale on ebay for just under $1700.
Is the 1 point worth the extra $300?
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 Posted 09/13/2019  7:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add moxking to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Depends on if you are competing in registry sets.

If so - the limit is much higher than the sky.
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 Posted 09/13/2019  7:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's what it comes down to. Insanity.
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 Posted 09/13/2019  8:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Be patient. Wait 2-5 years.
If, after that time, and you are still interested,
buy it in the numismatic after market, as a bullion piece.

I rarely buy NCLT, and then only as above.
I never buy NCLT as new mint product.
Edited by sel_69l
09/13/2019 8:26 pm
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 Posted 09/13/2019  10:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add basebal21 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Since it sounds like you're talking about a decade or more into the future it is impossible to have any real idea what a price could even potentially be. There are just simply to many unknowns at this point included the final sales numbers of the coin itself. The price of palladium will play a role in the price, how big of a role is yet to be determined. The mintage, what they do with the rest of the series, how they grade, what's popular at the time, the economy, cost of living etc will all play roles in the pricing as well. If you're thinking that far out I wouldn't even worry about the price, just weather or not you want one.

In the short term I do believe the raised mintage took some wind out of it's sales, but they may lead to a lower final number and there have been instances of a special offering becoming more popular later on.
Fire A.J. Preller
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 Posted 09/13/2019  11:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Buyer's decision to take that risk on 'too many unknowns', but after a 2-5 year waiting period, some of those 'unknowns' will be known, and thus the decision to buy (or not to), will be more accurate.

Only very rarely does it turn out, that when buying new NCLT mint product, can a profit be made in the numismatic after market. Don't allow yourself to be bamboozled by the fancy packaging and marketing.
Edited by sel_69l
09/13/2019 11:33 pm
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 Posted 09/13/2019  11:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add basebal21 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Buyer's decision to take that risk on 'too many unknowns', but after a 2-5 year waiting period, some of those 'unknowns' will be known, and thus the decision to buy (or not to), will be more accurate.


The problem is that all that will really be known at that point is what the final sales were for this. He's said he likes the coin and would be putting it away for his kids which potentially (and hopefully) means decades. 2-5 years we won't know anymore about what the economy, future offerings, metal prices a decade or longer from that date than we do today.

Even if it happened to be $200-300 cheaper 5 years from now what means more that money or half a decade of enjoying it? At either price is will very likely and certainly hopefully be a long long time before it would be sold and nothing guarantees that it would be cheaper in a few years anyways.

Fire A.J. Preller
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 Posted 09/14/2019  07:37 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Ballyhoo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Palladium is a rare element used primarily in the automotive industry in catalytic converters. As for coinage, Sierra Leone was the first to use it for striking coins in 1966. For investment purposes, which is to my knowledge the only use for it pertaining to coinage, the metal is highly volatile financially and caution used when buying it. For instance, Russia, having some of the largest reserves of the white-metal, drove the price to a then record high of $1340 per ounce in 2000. In the ensuing panic the automotive manufactures began stockpiling supplies fearing a shortage. Almost immediately following the high, the price rapidly dropped to $614 per ounce in 2001 and Ford lost about a billion dollars. Now granted, other countries mine the stuff. Canada and Montana in the United States are a few. Yet the price still fluctuates far greater than gold or silver making it a questionable investment.

So, considering the uses of palladium in the market place, as technology advance it would be hard to predict a long term number as an investment. My thoughts are it will probably settle at or near the $1000 dollar mark and stabilize. Despite closing Friday at $1611.50. Gold has and always will be the better investment long term.
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 Posted 09/14/2019  07:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Big-Kingdom to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
My opinion, and just that, it's a bullion coin and the money they charge doesn't have much collector demand behind it, there aren't many collectors of palladium coins that even if the mintage was 5000 pieces total there still would be too many of them minted to make it go up in value as a collector piece.

You'd be much better served buying graded, problem free, key date coins in various grades or just one that is higher graded with that $2000, to put them up and they will always be in demand and an easy sell later on.

There's always gonna be a demand for a 1909S or 1909S VDB Lincoln cent, always gonna be a demand for a 32 D or S quarter, ect.
The only caveat I'd say that its better to sell coins in the winter than the summer the market is better to get you the most out of it.
Whoever inherit's them from you should be made aware of that fact so they don't take a summer slowdown hit if they decide to sell it off.

Palladium is a precious metal in general a commodity and it's tied to spot prices. If collector demand were there I'd say it would be a maybe, but the demand isn't there. Heck even with silver or gold Eagles people pay more for proofs but if the time comes to sell, the shop is going to do something around spot price and not even factor collector value unless it's a rarity/low mintage key date.
They will want to take it for bullion.

Up to you. Just wanted to put that out there. I think key date coins are the better investment and a easier sell later.
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 Posted 09/14/2019  08:06 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add joecoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
That's what it comes down to. Insanity.



One could say its just a higher level of insanity. After all, what's sane about collecting any coins?
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