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Is This 1918 D Buffalo Corroded?

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 11 / Views: 269Next Topic  
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United States
428 Posts
 Posted 11/22/2020  1:51 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add johnny676767 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hello,

Do you see the black speckling on the surfaces of this coin? Is this corrosion or another type of environmental damage? It looks porous.

Thanks

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1918-D-Ind...46890.l49292

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United States
74 Posts
 Posted 11/22/2020  2:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CoinsInVT to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Environmental damage, and likely cleaned.
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United States
2032 Posts
 Posted 11/22/2020  2:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ijn1944 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I've seen hundreds, of not thousands of similar nickels--environmental damage/staining acquired over many, many years. Coin may have been cleaned in the past, but not a clear-cut issue.
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 Posted 11/22/2020  3:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add westernsky to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looks pretty good for a 102 year old nickel.

I think it would straight grade Good to Very Good if it was submitted.
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United States
14312 Posts
 Posted 11/22/2020  5:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add T-BOP to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I don't believe that's corrosion , just ED and a touch of pitting .
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 Posted 11/23/2020  08:26 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add just carl to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I wouldn't want that coin.
just carl
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4969 Posts
 Posted 11/23/2020  09:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kanga to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
IMO it's just showing circulation wear.
Describe it as if there were no picture.
Picture it as if there were no description.
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 Posted 11/23/2020  09:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I agree. This looks very typical to me.
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 Posted 11/23/2020  7:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add whatdowehavehere to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'm guessing "Naval Jelly"...
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 Posted 11/23/2020  8:32 pm  Show Profile   Check colonialjohn's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add colonialjohn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sometimes cleaning or environmental damage can be complex. We all hear the story that the average PCGS grader looks at a coin for 5 minutes even if 2-3 people review it. Any non-homogenous surfaces sometimes can lead IMO to incorrect conclusions. Also environmental damage is another classification that makes me wonder sometimes on coins particualrly 100 years or older.

https://nnp.wustl.edu/library/book/579875

I have another coin coming in shortly which is PCGS Environmental Damage. Environmental damage IMO can come about when we see high levels of sulfur or chlorides on the surface if we are either talking copper or silver. PCGS or NGC simply use 5X visual techniques. My article makes the point.

This analysis cost me $200 so I felt strongly to report these results. SEM/EDS surface analysis is costly with high end laboratories at usually $200/hour testing fees. My point here there are ALOT of 15th-19thC coins getting CLEAN or Environmental Damage tags - some may be - others may be something else.

John Lorenzo
Numismatist
New Jersey
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 Posted 11/25/2020  12:12 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add johnny676767 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That's a really interesting paper. Thanks for the link. I honestly didn't follow all of the chemistry, but I understand your point. However, isn't it the environment in some form or another that brings out the discoloration, including the black spots? It seems like there would be degrees of variation in aspects of the minting process, e.g. amalgamation, that would lead coins to react differently under similar environmental situations. Clearly, I see you demonstrated that the coin was not improperly cleaned. Are you saying such an example shouldn't be considered environmentally damaged either?
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 Posted 11/27/2020  03:59 am  Show Profile   Check Paradime Coins's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Paradime Coins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
looks like a normal circulated wear, perhaps it was in an envelope prior
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