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T. Carisius Silver Denarius, 46 Bc, Image Of Coin Striking Instruments:

 
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 Posted 12/29/2020  7:48 pm Show Profile   Check louisvillekyshop's eBay Listings Bookmark this topic Add louisvillekyshop to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
T. Carisius Silver Denarius, 46 BC, Image of Coin Striking Instruments:
Obv. MONETA, Draped bust of Juno Moneta to right.
Rev. T·CARISIVS, Coining implements; all within laurel wreath.
Syd. 982; Craw. 464/2.
19 mm, 3.37 grams






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 Posted 12/29/2020  8:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
That design is way cool @lks! Thx for posting.
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 Posted 12/29/2020  8:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The original looking flip would add to the provenance.
Staples no sign of rust, must have been kept in a dry place.
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 Posted 12/29/2020  8:52 pm  Show Profile   Check louisvillekyshop's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add louisvillekyshop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Sel_691: Now you have me curious about the staple so I took a photo of one of them I did not disturb to photograph the coin..




Edited by louisvillekyshop
12/29/2020 8:54 pm
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 Posted 12/29/2020  9:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
For me, I always replace the 2x2 that a coin is in, but I agree that having longer provenance is super!
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

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 Posted 12/29/2020  9:42 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fancy that!! I have never graded staples before !
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 Posted 12/30/2020  11:59 am  Show Profile   Check louisvillekyshop's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add louisvillekyshop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Now I am trying to get a firm handle on the Moneta title. Thus this article below doesn't really clear up much, but it does put some doubt to the broad statements you find elsewhere that say this or that is the reason for the title with a bit too much confidence in my opinion.

Aedes Junonis Monetae
Article on pp 289-209;290 of
Samuel Ball Platner (as completed and revised by Thomas Ashby):
A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome,
London: Oxford University Press, 1929.

Iuno Moneta — Iuno Moneta Regina in one inscription (CIL VI.362) — AEDES (templa, Ovid; να#972;ς, Plut.; #7985;ερ#8056;ν #7981;ρας Μον#942;της, Suidas), a temple vowed by M. Furius Camillus during the war with the Aurunci in 345 B.C., erected by duoviri appointed by the senate pro amplitudine populi Romani, and dedicated in 344 (Liv. VII.28.4#8209;6). It was on the arx, on the site formerly occupied by the house of M. Manlius Capitolinus (q.v.), which had been destroyed in 384 B.C. (Liv. VI.20.13; Val. Max. VI.3.1; Ov. Fast. I.638; VI.34, 183). Titus Tatius is also said to have lived on this site (Plut. Rom. 20; Solin. I.21). The temple was dedicated on 1st June (Ov. Fast. VI.183; Macrob. I.12.30; Hemer. Venus. ad Kal. Iun.; Fast. Ant. ap. NS 1921, 97, which also mentions a festival on 10th October1 (cf. CIL I2 p331). In it were kept the libri lintei (Liv. IV.7.12, 20.8), and it is mentioned in connection with the prodigia for 196 B.C. (Liv. XXXIII.26.8: ad Monetam duarum hastarum spicula arserant). It is altogether probable that this temple of Camillus replaced an earlier cult centre of Iuno Moneta, to which reference is made by Plutarch (Cam. 27), when speaking of the sacred geese that were kept around her temple in 390 B.C.

Various explanations were given by the Roman antiquarians of the epithet Moneta. Cicero (de Div. I.101) says that it was derived from the warning voice of the goddess, heard in the temple on the occasion of an earthquake, 'ut sue plena procuratio fieret'. Suidas (s.v. Μον#8134;τα) states that during the war with Tarentum the Romans, needing money, obtained it by following the advice of Juno; and that in gratitude they gave her the epithet Moneta and decided to establish the mint in her temple. None of the explanations yet suggested is satisfactory, and even the usual derivation of the word Moneta from moneo is open to doubt (Walde, Etym. Wörterb. 2nd ed. 493). The mint was in the temple during the last centuries of the republic, perhaps established there in 269 when silver coinage was introduced into Rome (Liv. IV.20.13; Cic. ad Att. VIII.7.3), and was called Moneta or ad Monetam. It seems to have been removed at the end of the first century (see Moneta), and nothing further is heard of the temple (Jord. I.2.108#8209;111; WR 190; Rosch. II.592#8209;594, 603, 612; RE X.1118).

Not a trace of it has been found in the works for the erection of the monument to Victor Emmanuel, and it may have occupied the site of the transepts of the church of S. Maria in Aracoeli (Hülsen, Bilder aus der Geschichte des Kapitols (Rome, 1899), 31). For an antefix from an earlier temple on the site see Cons. 323, No. 103 and reff.
Edited by louisvillekyshop
12/30/2020 11:59 am
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 Posted 12/31/2020  03:01 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Kushanshah to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The idea that moneta as the Latin word for money (and indeed our own word "money" itself) may derive from the epithet of the goddess rather than the other way around is fascinating in a counter-intuitive etymological sort of way. Especially at 3am.
Edited by Kushanshah
12/31/2020 03:02 am
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 Posted 12/31/2020  08:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jskirwin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice write-up Kushanshah, and really a fascinating coin - one of the few that shows how coins were made.

Considering it makes the world go around, the fact that we don't have a clear origin of the term makes for an enduring mystery.
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