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Post Your Coin Or Medal With A Quill/Quill Pen

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 Posted 01/18/2022  08:12 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I thought I'd start a thread with a less-traveled theme in an attempt to see how deeply CCF members can search their collections. I checked Numista, and there are dozens of coins that feature a quill/quill pen within their design. So, we should (hopefully) be able to put together a reasonable thread.

A quill appears to be a popular design element on coins/medals issued to celebrate writers of the past and important historical documents.

I'll kick things off with a look at a coin from the classic-era of US commemorative coins and its often overlooked quill.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 01/18/2022  08:16 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The classic-era 1923 US commemorative half dollar that commemorates the 100th anniversary of the enunciation of the Monroe Doctrine is my first offering.

On its obverse, the Monroe Doctrine Centennial half dollar features conjoined, left-facing portraits of President James Monroe, the fifth US President (he served March 4, 1817 - March 4, 1825), and his Secretary of State John Quincy Adams (September 22, 1817 - March 3, 1825). JQA was the son of John Adams, the second US President, and succeeded Monroe to become the sixth US President - the first father-son US presidents pair. Monroe is the portrait in the rear of the design.

The coin's reverse presents stylized versions of North and South America - the primary land masses of the Western Hemisphere. The two continents are represented by two contorted female figures that mimic the general shape of each continent. In the field to the left of the Americas is seen a small scroll and a quill pen, meant to represent or suggest the original Doctrine.

Many think the Monroe Doctrine was a standalone document - like the Declaration of Independence or the Gettysburg Address. In fact, the principles that, as a group, came to be known as the Monroe Doctrine were statements made by Monroe during his annual address to Congress in December 1823 (largely written by John Quincy Adams). That said, it can be stated with near certainty that the principles were drafted using a quill pen.

Chester Beach is credited as the designer and modeler of the coin's designs.

1923 Monroe Doctrine Centennial Half Dollar





For other of my post about the Monroe Doctrine Half Dollar, check out:

- 1923 Monroe Doctrine Centennial
- 1923 Monroe Doctrine Centennial - Coins with Conjoined Portraits Thread
- 1923 Monroe Doctrine Centennial - Coins with Hands Thread
- 1923 Monroe Doctrine Centennial - Coins with Flora Thread
-


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
01/18/2022 08:18 am
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 Posted 01/18/2022  08:45 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
In 1987, the United States staged celebrations across the nation for the bicentennial of the signing of the US Constitution that took place in September 1787 during the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia. The milestone event was marked by celebrations at the local, state and national levels and was the subject of many numismatic collectibles. Collectors can build an impressive topical collection around a theme of the US Constitution Bicentennial!

A pair of US non-circulating legal tender (NCLT) coins were struck by the US Mint for the celebrations: a Silver Dollar and a Gold Half Eagle ($5.00 coin).

Presented here is the Silver Dollar. Its obverse design features a quill pen presented over pages of parchment paper (alluding to the US Constitution) with "We the People" (the famous opening phrase of the US Constitution) written below it. The coin's reverse presents a large group of people of varied time periods and descents that is meant to represent the wide diversity to be found among the peoples of the US.


1987 US Constitution Bicentennial Silver Dollar



For a story about a philatelic-numismatic cover (PNC) that features the coin, check out:

- 1987 US Constitution PNC


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
01/18/2022 08:47 am
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 Posted 01/18/2022  09:42 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another constitution example.



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 Posted 01/18/2022  10:59 am  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
1985 France 10 francs commemorating Victor Hugo, author of Les Miserables:

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 Posted 01/18/2022  3:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Post #7,000!


Very nice gold $5.00 muddler! Here's the Half Eagle I have in my collection, along with a little story...

Both the Silver Dollar (presented above) and the Gold Half Eagle, presented here, include the phrase "We the People" - the words that begin the Preamble of the US Constitution. The words represent the "Who" portion of the "Who?/Why?/What?" message delivered by the Preamble:

Who? We the People of the United States
Why? in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity
What? do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.


On its obverse, the gold coin presents a stylized. left-facing bald eagle that is clutching a quill pen in its right talon; the quill extends in a northeast direction across the face of the coin. In the background are seen 13 rays of sun light - the "13" being representative of the original 13 states that ratified the US Constitution.

The reverse design also features a quill. The feather is presented at the design's center with "We the People" inscribed over/in front of it. The "Sept 17 1787" date to the left of the quill (viewer's perspective) refers to the date the delegates at the Constitutional Convention signed the document. Thirteen stars are symbolically included in the design (same symbolism as on obverse).

The coin's designs are the work of independent artist/sculptor Marcel Jovine. (The Silver Dollar's designs were created by Patrica L. Verani.)


1987 US Constitution Bicentennial Gold Half Eagle




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 01/19/2022  07:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Bill of Rights followed the US Constitution and represented its first 10 amendments. Its 10 ratified amendments (of a proposed 12) established the basic human rights and civil liberties within the United States in the 18th/early 19th century. It did not cover all issues of equality and rights, but the amendments did create a foundation upon which more could be done - and has been done in the years since their ratification. The current US Constitution has 27 amendments.

In 1993, the US Mint struck a three-coin commemorative program to honor James Madison, the primary author of the Bill of Rights (BoR), and celebrate the BoR's 200-year history. The program included a Silver Half Dollar, a Silver Dollar and a Gold Half Eagle. The Silver Half Dollar is the subject of this post.

The coin's obverse design, created by US Mint Sculptor-Engraver T. James Ferrell, depicts James Madison in the foreground, holding a quill pen as he works on the BoR. In the background is seen Montpelier, the Virginia home of the Founding Father.

As its central element, the Half Dollar's reverse design presents the Torch of Freedom being held aloft, with the inscriptions "THE BILL OF RIGHTS" and "OUR BASIC FREEDOMS" flanking it. Below each inscription is a single, five-pointed star that is used to bring emphasis to the corresponding inscription. The design is by free-lance graphic artist/designer Dean E. McMullen; the modeling of the design was handled within the Mint's Engraving Department.

Neither the BoR Silver Dollar nor its Gold Half Eagle includes a quill pen - just the Silver Half Dollar.

1993 James Madison - Bill of Rights Silver Half Dollar



For the story of the American Numismatic Association ( ANA) "Freedom Pack" that features an edge-lettered James Madison/BoR half dollar, check out:

- 1993 A N A - James Madison Freedom Pack Redux


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 Posted 01/19/2022  07:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add triggersmob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Spain - Miguel de Cervantes and quill


View my Coins here, (NOW WITH OVER 16,800 IMAGES).... http://www.coincommunity.org/galler...hp?cat=10048
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 Posted 01/19/2022  12:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
To help commemorate the US Bicentennial era, the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration (ARBA) sponsored a series of US Mint-struck uncirculated bronze and proof silver medals between 1972 and 1976. I've discussed all of them over in the "Official PNC (Philatelic Numismatic Cover) Thread" in the "Main Coin Forum" area.

You can check out my posts on the ARBA PNCs beginning here: ARBA PNCs

The series includes two medals that feature a quill pen in their design: 1974 and 1976.

The 1974 ARBA medal presents a left-facing portrait of John Adams on its obverse. Adams served in both the First and Second Continental Congresses, representing Massachusetts. He was a strong advocate for American independence. Adams was the US' first Vice President, serving under George Washington, and went on to be elected as the nation's second President.

On its reverse is seen a male figure representative of the delegates who attended the Continental Congress and debated what to do regarding their grievances against the Crown. The figure is presented in front of a simple relief map of the American colonies, The delegate holds several sheaves of parchment in his outstretched left hand - symbolic of presenting them to the Crown in England - while holding a quill pen in his right hand. As a whole, the design symbolizes the united colonies' desire to formally present their grievances and work toward solutions with King George III. The medal's designs are the work of Robert A. Weinman, who was President of the National Sculpture Society at the time.


1974 ARBA Bronze Medal from PNC


1974 ARBA Proof Silver Medal

(Image Credit: Image courtesy of PCGS Coinfacts, http://www.PCGS.com.) (I couldn't image my silver medal at the moment, but I think the PCGS image presents the designs clearly.)



Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
01/19/2022 12:42 pm
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 Posted 01/19/2022  12:56 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Post #7,000!


Congratulations on the milestone - and I do say that every one of them have been of the highest quality; each filled with numismatic knowledge and given in the spirit of education and sharing.

I also must suggest that you are currently about 102,000 posts or so behind jbuck.

This is a fun thread, I've enjoyed reading commems stories behind these modern commemorative that, while I don't collect them, I can still appreciate their beauty and history.
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.jk-dk.art
Too many hobbies .... too much work .... not enough time.
Edited by nickelsearcher
01/19/2022 12:57 pm
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 Posted 01/19/2022  1:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I also must suggest that you are currently about 102,000 posts or so behind jbuck.

Yeah, I figure if he stops posting today and I increase my posting rate to an average of 10 per day, I'll catch him in 2050. No problem!


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 Posted 01/19/2022  3:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
1974 ARBA Bronze Medal from PNC
Very nice!

Quote:
Yeah, I figure if he stops posting today and I increase my posting rate to an average of 10 per day, I'll catch him in 2050. No problem!
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 Posted 01/20/2022  10:03 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's the 1976 American Revolution Bicentennial Administration (ARBA) medal - in bronze and silver.

The primary author of the Declaration of Independence and third US President - Thomas Jefferson - is presented on the medal's obverse via a left-facing bust portrait.

The insert that came with the PNC refers to the reverse design as being representative of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The fact that the medal depicts Thomas Jefferson on its obverse and the position of the quill pen on the document itself leads me to consider that the scene is meant to be representative of the drafting of the document vs. the signing of it by Continental Congress delegates (but it could just be a case of a mis-positioned quill pen!).

The medal's design is the work of Michael Lantz.


1976 ARBA Bronze Medal from PNC


1976 ARBA Silver Medal



Here's more on the 1976 ARBA medal:

- 1976 ARBA PNC


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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