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What 8 Reales Was Most Typically Used In The Colonies?

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 4 / Views: 701Next Topic  
Valued Member
United States
241 Posts
 Posted 09/16/2022  1:48 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add TimNH to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi all, I asked in the silver dollar type set thread but it probably deserves its own topic. 8 Reale pieces span a great range of centuries (1500s-1800s) and countries (Bolivia, Mexico, Spain most commonly but there are others). You have the 'cob' types and the 'coin' types as well. What do you think would best fit the bill?

I suppose to get a true "colonial piece" it would have a US counterstamp of sorts.. many thanks, I've come up quite empty researching online.
Pillar of the Community
United States
2682 Posts
 Posted 09/16/2022  4:35 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add thq to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
This 1834 shipwreck-recovered Mexican 8R might give you some ideas. A mixture of Hispanic and American coins were recovered from the wreck.

https://www.pristineauction.com/a43...Encapsulated

I would find a contemporaneous example like this one, backdated 10-20 years for it to get to America. Any 1750's Mexico silver would have circulated in the American colonies before the Revolution. There would be no special marking.

I would expect that very few if any cobs circulated in America. They came from an earlier period, and were made to be exported to Spain and melted, not for circulation as coins.

Consider getting a Dutch daalder too.

"Two minutes ago I would have sold my chances for a tired dime." Fred Astaire
Edited by thq
09/16/2022 4:48 pm
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
20610 Posts
 Posted 09/16/2022  11:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The most common 8 Reale coins that appear to have been used contemporarily by developing countries and colonies around the World are those of Carolus 111 and Carolus 1V.
As a personal opinion, I find their coin effigies to be rather ugly.

As such, Spanish colonial coins of this era were more commonly used than those of any other major Power.

Such coins can take their place in a collection that illustrates the history of development of early coinage of many countries, including the United States.

In the case of the United States, they do not necessarily have to be counter marked.
Valued Member
United States
241 Posts
 Posted 09/18/2022  02:11 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TimNH to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you folks, I hunted quite a bit online and found very little on this topic. Always amazed at the expertise here, I like the idea of a mid 1700s Mexico, will get on the hunt.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1766 Posts
 Posted 09/18/2022  5:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jfransch to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Spanish dollars were made legal tender in the United States by an Act of February 9, 1793, and were not demonetized until February 21, 1857. Testaments to the importance of these coins continue in that "two bits," "pieces of eight" and "picayune" have become part of the American vocabulary. Also, it is interesting to observe that when the New York Stock Exchange opened in 1792 rates were reported in terms of New York shillings which were valued at eight to the Spanish milled dollar, hence changes were reported in eighths. Amazingly, over two hundred years after adoption of the decimal system, stock and security price variations are still reported in eighths!

From the February 9, 1793 Act (sourced to the History of The US Mint Website) :
"the gold coins of France, Spain and the dominions of Spain, of their present standard, at the rate of one hundred cents for every twenty-seven grains and two-fifths of a grain, of the actual weight thereof. Spanish milled dollars, at the rate of one hundred cents for each dollar, the actual weight whereof shall not be less than seventeen pennyweights and seven grains; and in proportion for the parts of a dollar."
"Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself."
-Mark Twain
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