Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Commems Collection: 1936 Cleveland Ephemera II

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 6 / Views: 2,049Next Topic  
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
5937 Posts
 Posted 10/09/2013  7:00 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
In my previous posts about the 1936 Cleveland Great Lakes Exposition half-dollar, I described the one- and two-coin black leatherette holders in which the coins were sold. The first 201 coins struck received "white glove" handling and were housed in notarized holders that indicated their strike sequence number. Coins struck after this initial batch were handled and processed in the normal manner; some of them were placed in the same style of black leatherette holder, but without the notarization. (Original posts here http://goccf.com/t/116328 and here http://goccf.com/t/128834.)

While these holders are far from common, diligent searching will likely turn up an example or two at a larger coin show or auction.

Scarcer than the leatherette holders are the small white numbered envelopes that were used to house coins sold on-site at the Great Lakes Exposition. The dimensions of the envelopes are just under 3-5/8" wide by 2-1/8" tall. The envelope features a "Great Lakes Exposition / Cleveland Centennial / Commemorative Half Dollar" imprint in black along with a number imprinted in blue on its front; the back of the envelope is blank.

Read More: Commems Collection

In the 1981 Breen/Swiatek Encyclopedia of Silver & Gold Commemorative Coins, it was noted that the surviving examples of the envelopes were rather scarce and that the authors knew of just three specimens. Since then, additional examples of the envelopes have surfaced and later references (including those from Anthony Swiatek) do not mention such a low population.

In addition to the "933" envelope shown below, I've seen envelopes featuring the numbers 75, 161, 641, 738 and 927; a few years ago, I saw several available on eBay but did not record their numbers. I'd hazard a guess and estimate that there are likely somewhere in the range of 20 to 30 of the envelopes in the hands of collectors.

Though the numbers on the envelopes are sometimes described as such, they do not represent the sequential strike number of the coin off the Mint presses. The numbers are merely an inventory or stock number for use during sale of the coins. As I noted above, only the first 201 coins struck were recorded and handled with special care.

I've looked for a nice example of the Cleveland / Great Lakes Exposition envelope for a number of years and was happy recently to add one to my collection. I've also included images of the coin that I purchased with the envelope. I can't say with any certainty that the coin is original to the envelope. In fact, I tend to believe the opposite. There's just no way of knowing for sure with any of these coin/envelope pairs as it is a very simple matter to make a switch.

To add some additional "color" to this post, I've also included a couple of images from the Expo's "Official Souvenir Guide."

Enjoy!


1936 Cleveland Centennial/Great Lakes Exposition Imprinted Envelope - Front




1936 Cleveland Centennial/Great Lakes Exposition Half-Dollar - Obverse




1936 Cleveland Centennial/Great Lakes Exposition Half-Dollar - Reverse




Great Lakes Exposition Official Souvenir Guide - Front Cover



The cover illustrates the impressive main entrance to the Exposition.


Great Lakes Exposition Official Souvenir Guide - Welcome Page




Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
10/09/2013 7:03 pm
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
7121 Posts
 Posted 10/09/2013  7:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
happy recently to add one to my collection.


Any addition to your museum quality collection is a cause for celebration!

The breadth and depth of your collection never ceases to amaze me commems ... I truly enjoy reading anything that you write on this topic.

Best

David
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.finewoodcrafter.com
Too many hobbies .... too much work .... not enough time.
Pillar of the Community
United States
918 Posts
 Posted 10/09/2013  7:45 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add tpg22 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply


You are a great asset to this forum. Your knowledge of the subject is incredible. Your collection is inspiring. Some day I hope to add a few of the coins you have written about.
Valued Member
United States
467 Posts
 Posted 10/09/2013  9:12 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Not Mint to Be to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Cleveland Commem was the very first commem that I had every purchased. That was in 1969. At that time I purchased Raw "BU" ones. I didn't know much about grading and they weren't all BU either. I later traded most of them for silver or gold. If there were any that I would like to have back it would be the 1938 PDS Oregon set. That was a great looking set.
Moderator
Learn More...
United States
101057 Posts
Pillar of the Community
United Kingdom
8799 Posts
 Posted 10/10/2013  2:45 pm  Show Profile   Check NumisRob's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add NumisRob to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Great topic, commems!

As an Englishman I am absolutely fascinated by the traditional US Commemorative series and it's great to read such a lot of background information. I bought a copy of COINage magazine on a trip to the States in May 2004 and there was an article by Tom DeLorey about these coins. I only have a few of the more common ones in my own collection - 1893 Columbian Expo, 1920 Pilgrim, 1923 Monroe Doctrine, 1925 Stone Mountain, 1946 Booker T Washington and 1951 Washington/Carver.

Much as I love the actual coins, I pity the poor US collector on a budget who wants to get a specimen of every different half-dollar (including mintmarks) issued in 1936! The Franklin and Pobjoy Mints must have got their inspiration from Philadelphia...
Edited by NumisRob
10/10/2013 2:46 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
4052 Posts
 Posted 10/10/2013  4:04 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bpoc1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
After seeing this Commemorative I was on the hunt. Sailing on the Great Lakes for a couple of years for SIU, " Seafarers' International Union." The
reverse stars showing all the major ports I went into.
Picked up a beauty this summer at the Chicago show this summer.
Thanks Commems for the history
  Previous TopicReplies: 6 / Views: 2,049Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.





Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2021 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.3 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05