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Im Interested In World Coins Like A US Goloid Coin

 
 
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New Member
United States
15 Posts
 Posted 11/17/2019  03:12 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add jny to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi I'm interested in finding out about other countries who mixed gold in their silver coins kinda like the us goloid pattern coin. does anyone know about these ive found one but I cant remeber what it was called or what country internet search is not working for me, thanks for any help
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Russian Federation
2870 Posts
 Posted 11/17/2019  03:55 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add january1may to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The Mexican state of Guerrero issued some coins in 1914-15 that contained 0.3 grams of gold (1 peso) or 0.595 grams (2 pesos); at a weight of roughly 12 grams per peso, this means approximately 2.5% gold.

Siberian copper coins from the 1760s and 1770s contained even less gold (variously given as 90-300 ppm), but 1) I'm not sure how deliberate that was, and 2) at 0.79% silver content they weren't exactly silver coins either.

On the higher end, mid-19th century Japanese "gold" coins were roughly 20% gold and 80% silver.
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Canada
2864 Posts
 Posted 11/17/2019  06:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add oriole to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Canada issued a $100 gold coin that was 14 karat (about 58% gold). A few others in the Caribbean have issued them in 50% gold. A natural gold-silver alloy is called electrum. I am not sure if this is what you wanted to know.
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Australia
13197 Posts
 Posted 11/17/2019  6:20 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Early Australian sovereigns, the Sydney Mint type (pre-1870), were struck from 22k gold with the remainder silver, rather than copper. Australia had abundant silver mines at the time, but no copper mines, so using locally-made silver was actually cheaper than importing copper. The coins look "paler" by comparison with copper-diluted sovereigns. Because of the high silver content, Sydney sovereigns were actually preferred in trade in India and the Middle East over London-minted sovereigns. Once the Colonial Office in London found out that the barbarians were preferring Australian coins to good British coins, they forced the Sydney mint to stop producing the high-silver sovereigns and conform to the Imperial standard, in both design and composition.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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Australia
13197 Posts
 Posted 11/17/2019  6:29 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The silver crown was Britain's largest circulating silver coin in the 1800s. It was a bit too large and cumbersome for everyday use, so they briefly considered the idea of issuing a bimetallic coin. But rather than mixing the gold and silver in an alloy, they considered an option very similar in concept to the bimetallic coins actually issued throughout the world over a hundred years later. The coins would have been about the size of a florin (a bit bigger than a US quarter) with a large silver ring surrounding a small plug of gold in the centre.

While the idea was eventually discarded due to the increased cost of producing blanks for such coins, some private patterns demonstrating the concept were struck by lobbyist Joseph Moore. Example on CoinArchives. Moore similarly proposed reducing the size of the copper penny by making it bimetallic with a silver core.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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United Kingdom
2346 Posts
 Posted 11/19/2019  03:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bacchus2 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I assume you already know about the ancient Greek Electrum coins

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrum
Valued Member
United States
265 Posts
 Posted 11/22/2019  06:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Rdwarrior to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Japan had the Shu and the Bu coins, both of 20-30% gold in silver

https://en.numista.com/catalogue/pieces16677.html
http://www.antiquesage.com/samurai-...a-shogunate/
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United States
15 Posts
 Posted 11/26/2019  01:34 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jny to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The guerrero coin was the one I was originaly looking for. I had no idea there were so many different ones, I kinda like the idea of the electrum coins. I guess that means they just coined the metal just the way they found(mined)it without mixing
Thanks everyone for your your time and knowledge.
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Australia
13197 Posts
 Posted 11/26/2019  06:02 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I kinda like the idea of the electrum coins. I guess that means they just coined the metal just the way they found(mined)it without mixing

Actually, they didn't. While the use of electrum coins clearly evolved from the use as primitive money of naturally-occurring nuggets of electrum, chemical analysis of naturally occurring electrum found in the rivers of Lydia comes up with a composition typically around 70% to 90% gold. The electrum coinage, on the other hand, starts out at a consistent 55% gold and falls to around 40% by the end of the electrum coinages. The consistency of the composition in the coinage at any given time implies that the "electrum" was therefore produced by mixing relatively pure gold and silver, in known proportions.

TL;DR: it turns out the coins are actually made of "synthetic electrum", that had less gold in it than naturally-occurring electrum.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
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