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Unknown NE Colonial Coin Detector Find

 
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New Member

United States
39 Posts
 Posted 12/29/2019  6:02 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Detectorist to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Today I found this rough silver coin in an area on Eastern Long Island, NY which was first settled by CT Puritans during the 1640's. I have found Draped Bust cents from 1798 and 1801 here along with buttons and shoe buckles dating from the colonial period. Close to it I also found a colonial basic shoe buckle and a oval red stone piece of jewelry with a portrait carved on it and mounted in gold. This coin appears to be silver, is thick and unevenly rolled, with no discernible markings. I don't think this was from ground corrosion, it was made this crude and worn smoothly. Found it a good 7" deep, which is a full inch deeper than my late 1700's material in these poor soils now forested over. Could this be a Spanish cob or a piece of NE silver? Thanks.

New Member
United States
39 Posts
 Posted 12/29/2019  7:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Detectorist to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply



A piece of gilt red glass jewelry found near this coin, putting a face on this culture.
Valued Member
United States
76 Posts
 Posted 12/29/2019  8:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sir Derrin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It might be some of that Pareidolia but the tree type oak, pine and willow on the colonial coinage comes to mind looking at this...
I don't remember which where silver but some where...
Cool find either way :)

Your second picture looks like the back of a piece of jewelry that can be a broach , ring or necklace that is called a cameo the front would have been white most likely...
Valued Member
Canada
126 Posts
 Posted 12/29/2019  9:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ironhorse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
metal detecting for coins and relics opens a door to so many possibilities
I look at the "coin" disc and I don't feel it's a coin at all, to me it looks more like lead, and a typical find from a early American home site
the other great find is most likely a piece of broken watch chain fob in the style of a wax seal, sadly yours suffered a bit of damage but still a wonderful find
keep at the search, great old coins are just waiting to be dug up
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United States
14857 Posts
 Posted 12/29/2019  9:36 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@detectorist, could you please post the diameter, thickness, and weight of this piece? With zero details, it will be hard to pin down, but we might get lucky and find that it roughly fits the flan dimensions of a coin that was present in 17th-18th Century America. Thx.
"If you climb a good tree, you get a push."
-----Ghanaian proverb

"The danger we all now face is distinguishing between what is authentic and what is performed."
-----King Adz

New Member
United States
39 Posts
 Posted 12/29/2019  10:10 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Detectorist to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's definitely not lead. It will not bend or deform to the pressure of full-on finger twisting. It does not have lead powder exfoliate nor verdigris of copper. It was found walking distance from where ships landed in the area during the 1640's from CT. This forest was never developed and does not contain debris fields. In rough shape and uneven thickness is very similar to the first NE coins but lacking the markings. Will try to measure.
New Member
United States
39 Posts
 Posted 12/29/2019  10:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Detectorist to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply






I found this mid-1700's shoe buckle about 20 feet away and nothing else metal in a wide surrounding area. I'm certain it's a coin, but realize its worth has been been destroyed by shaving. The shaving is roughly half of each side tapering on opposite halves.
Valued Member
United States
339 Posts
 Posted 12/30/2019  05:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add lcutler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Positively not any of the NE coins. All of the earlier coins, the NE, Willow, Oak and the large planchet Pine tree coins were paper thin. The later small planchet pine tree coins were thicker but nowhere close to that thick.
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