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1995-D Washington P In Plurimus What's Happening

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 11 / Views: 382Next Topic  
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 Posted 03/07/2021  12:15 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add CHB to your friends list Get a Link to this Message

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 Posted 03/07/2021  12:18 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add merclover to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Whole photos, both sides, please.
ça va bien aller

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 Posted 03/07/2021  12:32 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CHB to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply







Best I can do at the present time
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United States
249 Posts
 Posted 03/07/2021  12:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Cujohn to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looks like the P took a hit from another coin
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United States
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 Posted 03/07/2021  02:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CHB to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Does not explain why the bottom of the P extends past the leg of the P and is raised to the extend it is Without a large indentation some where that would force the metal up. The mark above it is not large enough to account for the amount of metal.
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 Posted 03/07/2021  03:15 am  Show Profile   Check Yokozuna's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Yokozuna to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to the CCF!

with Cujohn on this one.

It really looks like the hit has moved enough metal to the South and West on the P to cause this. The E of E PLURIBUS and the A of STATES, as well as the field between the three points, also seem to show displaced metal, all possibly from the same hit, with some smoothing of the tops of the damage occurring with further circulation wear.
"Shine, shine a Roosevelt dime. All the way to Baltimore and runnin' out of time." Tom Waits-Clap Hands



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 Posted 03/07/2021  08:51 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Agree, circulation damage.



to the CCF!
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 Posted 03/07/2021  09:22 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ijn1944 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Post strike circulation damage. The P took a hit which moved metal--not terribly uncommon. Suggest getting your hands on an old quarter and try dinging/hitting various portions of the coin with another chunk of metal, like a steel bar--moderate blunt force striking the coin at a low angle. Them imagine that banged up coin being in constant circulation over time.
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 Posted 03/07/2021  10:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add JimmyD to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There are two things that can happen to a coin. Error or damage.
Seeing there is no way that could happen during the striking of the coin,
it has to be damage. It doesn't really matter how it became damaged, it is still damage.
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 Posted 03/09/2021  02:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CHB to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I fail to agree with what's visible on the coin as being caused by what has been described. I'm a Mechanical Engineer and can interpret what I see on the coin and I do not buy your explanation. The evidence on the coin does not support your conclusions. Thanks for your help
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 Posted 03/09/2021  03:05 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add merclover to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I agree with all of the above, your coin has displaced metal as a result of circulation damage.

CHB, I suggest you watch a few videos that would show how coins are minted. As JimmyD mentioned, with your coin you have either an error from the minting process or damage later from circulation. We here are familiar with the minting process, and we can tell you that yours is not a minting error. How did your circulation damage occur? There are a million ways damage can happen, but in the end, damage is damage.

ça va bien aller

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 Posted 03/09/2021  11:46 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add NickG to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
CHB I also agree with the evaluations above. As a mechanical engineer you do understand how things would move. As an engineer myself I had to shift my understanding from printing process to the actual act of pressing the planchet. You cannot always tell why or when damage happened only that it did. If a coin is perfectly struck and incurs no damage through the minting process it is worth more than one that might have been struck right after it and got dinged up after the press spit it out.
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