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Post Your Coins With Center Holes

 
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Pillar of the Community
United States
3807 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2014  6:04 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Lucky Cuss to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I wouldn't be surprised if this topic has been addressed here before, so I apologize in advance to anybody who's annoyed by its being repeated, if that's in fact the case.

Coins with center holes are associated most strongly with oriental issues, but there are plenty of others as well. I can see some practical aspects that might favor such a configuration. They can be strung together for ease of carry absent pocket or purse. A rod can serve to facilitate stacking them. Put graduated markings on said rod, and tallying becomes a snap.

But I kind of doubt any of those considerations account for this feature being incorporated into so many modern coins.

Here in the United States, it's tokens you see with a center hole, so I've included a couple of those at the top just for fun.

Incidentally, I haven't identified the middle coin in the second row. I don't even know that I haven't displayed one side and/or the other upside down!





This is a very modest sampling of the genre. Feel free to augment it.
Colligo ergo sum
Valued Member
United States
78 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2014  6:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Kenton to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
the middle coin definitely looks Korean. The script is the clue.
Pillar of the Community
Korea, Republic Of
1877 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2014  6:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Matteproof to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Heh-heh. I recognize that mystery coin" right off the bat!

It's a South Korean Busan student city bus token.
In the first pic, "ν™μƒ" means student, and in the second pic (which is upside-down), it says "λΆ€μ‚° μ‹œλ‚΄λ²„μŠ€," which means Busan city bus.

An easy tip to identifying it as Korean:
Korean characters have circles and ovals, which are nonexistent in Chinese or Japanese characters.

They seem to come up here once in a while. They sell for about a buck a piece here in Korea.
Edited by Matteproof
06/23/2014 6:36 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
3807 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2014  6:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Lucky Cuss to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
It's a South Korean Busan student city bus token....They seem to come up here once in a while. They sell for about a buck a piece here in Korea.


A coin shop I was in today had at least a half dozen of them, and no clue as to what they were.
Colligo ergo sum
Edited by Lucky Cuss
06/24/2014 10:57 am
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Australia
13114 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2014  6:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Holes are put in coins for various reasons.

Colonial regimes in Africa and the Pacific put holes in at least the low-denomination coins so that the locals, whose native dress did not include pockets, could carry them around on strings around their necks. That may sound patronising today, but it was the actual reason stated at the time. Your Southern Rhodesia coin is an example of this.

European early 20th century cupronickel coins are often holed. Very often these holed cupronickel coins replaced unholed silver coins the same size, making the hole a great big impossible-to-miss signpost shouting "this coin is not made of silver". The French, Danish and Norwegian coins probably fall under this category.

Other times, the hole is purely decorative, or used to help both humans and machines easily distinguish two similiar-sized coins from each other. In this sense the holes serve the same purpose as unusual shapes or different edges. The Greek and Spanish coins are in this category.

The holed tokens above are all used in countries (America and South Korea) where none of the actual coinage is holed, so a huge hole shouts "this is a token, not a coin". Some tokens (I'm thinking mainly of certain North American transport tokens and New Zealand milk tokens) have elaborately-shaped voids in them to even more accentuate their non-coin-ness.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
Canada
2805 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2014  7:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nalaberong to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I can only think of four countries with holed coins being used today - Denmark, Norway, Japan, and the Philippines. Interesting spread there!
Pillar of the Community
United States
3807 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2014  7:16 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Lucky Cuss to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
What's interesting about the Danish 25 ore is that from 1924 through WWII they were holed. Then from 1948 to 1967, the hole dsappeared, only to make a comeback from 1966 to 1988 (apparently there was an overlap in the styles in 1966-67).
Colligo ergo sum
Pillar of the Community
United States
3807 Posts
 Posted 06/23/2014  7:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Lucky Cuss to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Some tokens (I'm thinking mainly of certain North American transport tokens and New Zealand milk tokens) have elaborately-shaped voids in them to even more accentuate their non-coin-ness.


Here's one of that ilk, albeit a sales tax token.

Colligo ergo sum
Bedrock of the Community
Australia
15552 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2014  01:53 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
How many different types of World SILVER coins with central hole actually circulated?

I can think of only one type:
The .925 silver shilling of New Guinea.
They are relatively easy to obtain, in Australia, at least. I have all four dates: '35, '36, '38, & '45.
Pillar of the Community
1325 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2014  03:09 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add shadz to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
i just want a coin with a hole for my collection. all these look great even the tokens.
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Australia
13114 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2014  04:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Sap to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
How many different types of World SILVER coins with central hole actually circulated?

I can think of only one type:
The .925 silver shilling of New Guinea.

Does the Holey Dollar count?

For both the first and second reasons I gave above, silver coins almost never got themselves holed.
Don't say "infinitely" when you mean "very"; otherwise, you'll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite. - C. S. Lewis
Pillar of the Community
Canada
2805 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2014  09:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nalaberong to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There are some holed silvers from Thailand as well.
Bedrock of the Community
United States
15495 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2014  11:04 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Another reason for a holed coin would be to allow a coin of a specific amount of metal to have a larger diameter. (Coins work best I a certain size range, not too big or too small. If you have too many denominations the difference in sizes can become too slight, so you start adding holes and two coins of the same size can instantly be told apart. You hole the lower denomination or someone might try to pass off a low denomination as a high one by putting a hole in it.)

They also help in value identification in countries where a large percentage of the country is illiterate. Denominations are recognized by size, color, holed or not, etc.
Gary Schmidt
Edited by Conder101
06/24/2014 11:08 am
Pillar of the Community
United States
564 Posts
 Posted 06/24/2014  2:31 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add brg5658 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I only have a few holed coins.

I finished this little Belgian Congo copper type set late last year.





And I also liked this little Edward VIII piece:

Edited by brg5658
06/24/2014 2:31 pm
Pillar of the Community
United States
1281 Posts
 Posted 06/25/2014  4:58 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Chute72 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fork has hole off center.



Pillar of the Community
United States
2367 Posts
 Posted 06/25/2014  5:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add wheatchaser140 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here's a Greek 20 lepta from 1912.


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