Coin Community Family of Web Sites
Like us on Facebook! Subscribe to our Youtube Channel! Check out our Twitter! Check out our Pinterest!
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?


Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some coins?
Our coin forum is completely free! Register Now!

Which Halves (If Any) Will Have Collector Value Over Silver Value?

Next Page | Last 15 Replies
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 22 / Views: 2,128Next Topic
Page: of 2
Valued Member
United States
335 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  01:00 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add man2004 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I have been trying to dollar cost average 90% silver coins over the last several years. In the process, I have noticed the halves bring a small premium over quarters and dimes. I have also noticed that Walkers seem to bring the biggest premium of the 3 main half dollar types (WL, Franklin, Kennedy). Yet, I noticed that APMEX actually has more of a premium on Franklins than Walkers. I have been trying to buy as many lots as possible with WL halves hoping to find some decent teens or twenties. I have also plucked out around 10 G4ish Barber halves. Is anyone willing to speculate on which halves MIGHT have collector value over silver value. And, what would be the order in value? I would assume the order in value would be oldest to newest. On the other hand, if the coins are only worth their silver weight, the order could be newest (least ware) to oldest (most ware). Thank you in advance!
Bedrock of the Community
Learn More...
United States
10888 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  03:37 am  Show Profile   Check spruett001's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add spruett001 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I really don't have the experience but, I would say that any common silver halves (excluding the 40%) after Barbers are essentially the same. The best premiums may be found in Franklins (short run).

I don't deal much with silver. I did make $20 flipping a 1946 DDR Walker, though. I know this is not what you're asking but, I sold an LWC with a lamination error yesterday for 1,000x face. I know that some are not keen on errors and varieties but, that's the area that holds the most promise for me.

In Memory of Crazyb0
12-26-1951 to 7-27-2020
In Memory of Tootallious
3-31-1964 to 4-15-2020
Pillar of the Community
United States
3210 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  06:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Imthealphaomega to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Walkers usually have a slightly better premium than franklins and Kennedy halves. Barbers definitely have a bigger premium than the other 3, but good luck finding a barber Half that is in fine condition or better that you don't have to pay ridiculous prices for. I always go with walkers, they were around for 30 years, easily identified, and beautiful design.
Pillar of the Community
United States
4853 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  09:54 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kanga to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A couple general statements:

-- The older, the better:
But you will be paying the premium to acquire them.
Then if you want the additional premium that they will accrue you'll just have to sit back and wait.

-- The higher the grade, the better:
That means for Franklin's and Kennedy's mid-MS grades.
For WL's and Barber's better dates in VF or better; common dates AU or better.
SL's and earlier F or better.

Now, after all that if you are looking for growth in value you may not live that long.
Collectible coins are NOT a good investment.
Collectible coins are a hobby.

If you want investment potential then go for bullion.
And I don't mean bullion coins; I mean just straight .9999 bullion bars or rounds.

Describe it as if there were no picture.
Picture it as if there were no description.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1467 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  10:45 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coconutjoe to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Collectible coins are NOT a good investment.
Collectible coins are a hobby.


So true!

In 1962, the value of a dollar is worth around $100 today. I just purchased Bust halves that had Red Book values of $4~$5 in 1962. This means that the seller should have sold them for $400+ to recuperate his money. I purchased the for about half of that amount.

But one thing for sure that he did enjoyed his coins for 50+ years!


edit: Fun Fact

"BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY: $1,000 INVESTED 1962 IS WORTH $18+ MILLION TODAY"
Edited by Coconutjoe
09/29/2017 10:50 am
Pillar of the Community
United States
1491 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  11:21 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Andrew99 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
When silver is around what it is now, I can buy dimes and quarters for 12.4x and halves for 12.7x. You can sell some Walkers for $7 to $8 that can be bought for 12.7x, so that is why the premiums are higher. There will be some BU Franklins and 1964 Kennedys in some of these rolls that can be sold for $8 too.
The collection is in your mind. Dispose of your albums and free your mind from the tyranny of holes.
Pillar of the Community
United States
509 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  1:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CLS12 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The LCS that I used to frequent sold all 90% for same X amount.. he told me halves usually sold quicker. He generally had steady flow of barber (worn, but dates readable), walkers, Franklin and JFK. I flipped some and it might have been a fluke, but at time I'd pay 13-14x FV and sold Walkers for 20x on eBay plus shipping. Still if you -10% for eBay fees it was 18x range. Got some decent Franklin flips as well, but they were better quality... JFK's seemed like silver content only with no premium. I never bought any, but sold some I found CRH
Pillar of the Community
United States
583 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  2:19 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add otto to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
In 1962, the value of a dollar is worth around $100 today.


I'd have to dispute that claim, though I agree with the overall point about coins not being great investments,
Pillar of the Community
United States
1794 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  2:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Alpha2814 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
The inflation factor from 1962 is closer to 10, not 100.
Working on: Indian quarter eagles, Chinese pandas, and San Francisco tokens; upgrading my Peace dollar and US Type sets

"Fear is the enemy of will. Will is what makes you take action; fear is what stops you, and makes you weak."
-- Sinestro to (my avatar) Hal Jordan, "Green Lantern" (2011)
Pillar of the Community
United States
4853 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  2:37 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add kanga to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
But don't forget.
In 1980 silver rose to $50/oz for a short while thanks to the Hunt brothers.
But that dropped to under $10/oz in about a day.
Some people REALLY lost their shirts (and lots of other stuff).
Describe it as if there were no picture.
Picture it as if there were no description.
Pillar of the Community
United States
867 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  6:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Beefer518 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Buying power of $1 in 1962 had the same power as $8.18 does today, according to https://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpical...year2=201708
Valued Member
United States
414 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  9:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add cableguy815 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I don't know if agree with the "collectible coins are not an investment" bit. There is certainly much opportunity to invest if you cherry pick the right coins. This perhaps may be much more difficult with US coins, but in the realm of world coins, there is ample opportunity to "flip" coins for a profit.
Pillar of the Community
Learn More...
United States
9008 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  9:29 pm  Show Profile   Check paralyse's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add paralyse to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you lived in a house and had a household income of 50k in 1962, you were upper middle class and had plenty of disposable income. You probably had a fairly comfortable home, maybe even with AC, a color TV, and a new Cadillac, Lincoln or Chrysler in the driveway every year; this income bracket was mostly businessmen, business owners, bankers, doctors, and lawyers, and some very senior tradesmen.

If you live in a house and have a household income of 50k in 2017, you are probably "getting by" every month unless you are living alone and fairly unencumbered by debt, and likely not saving much cash in the process.

That is the "inflation measure." :P

FWIW -- when I buy 90% -- Barber halves seem to always carry a higher premium, especially if they are anywhere near full rim Good. If you are looking for numismatic value in junk silver, buying Barber halves in bulk and looking for semi-key dates is a good option, or coins that are G6 or better. Walkers will also hold value above bullion, especially the teens, twenties and thirties dates. I have a hard time getting rid of Franklins if I want to sell down, and won't usually buy them.
Member ANA - EAC - TNA - SSDC
Specializing in 1932-1964 Washington quarters

"Most of the things worth doing in the world had been declared impossible before they were done." -- Louis D. Brandeis
Pillar of the Community
United States
1636 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  9:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bump111 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you want to push the envelope a little, classic commemoratives will nearly always have value beyond their silver content. But you obviously won't find many "lots" for sale if you are buying in bulk?
Pillar of the Community
United States
1450 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  10:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add terry8835 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
If you bought Walkers in VF or better in years before 1930 I think those coins will have a decent numismatic premium in years to come. Getting them in anything better than just fine condition means an investment of dollars. There were quite a few years when less than 2 million coins were minted. Now coins are minted in the billions and are just base metal. I do remember when Walkers were common and by the later 1950's and 60's they were gone just like SLQ's and Mercury dimes. I know there are many younger people under 50 who have never even seen a Walker or a SLQ with a date. Not one silver coin in circulation I have seen in 30 years.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1467 Posts
 Posted 09/29/2017  10:47 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coconutjoe to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I'd have to dispute that claim, though I agree with the overall point about coins not being great investments,


I stand corrected.
I mis-read number of zeros. I wasn't quite born in 1962, but I need a glasses.
Page: of 2 Previous TopicReplies: 22 / Views: 2,128Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.



Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Coin Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Family- all rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Coin Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Contact Us  |  Advertise Here  |  Privacy Policy / Terms of Use

Coin Community Forum © 2005 - 2020 Coin Community Forums
It took 0.83 seconds to rattle this change. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05