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Difference between brilliant finish and circulation finish

 
 
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Pillar of the Community

United States
1080 Posts
 Posted 04/23/2018  5:00 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Bret to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I was on the mint's website today debating whether or not I should purchase a roll of 2018-S quarters when up pops a chat window. It's kind of irritating that you don't really have a complete set after purchasing both the proof and mint sets each year. I'm thinking that the mint should include the -S uncirculated quarters with the mint sets. So I took the opportunity to ask why the -S quarters not included with the mint sets.
In the chat the lady told me "Uncirculated Coins are hand-loaded into the coining press and struck on specially burnished blanks, yet have a soft, matte-like finish appearance. They are made like circulating coins (which are used every day as money), but with a special process that produces a brilliant finish." I'm doubting that they hand feed the blanks when producing mint sets. Am I correct in understanding that the quarter rolls and quarters in the mint sets are currently produced using the same process? She seems to think that it's somehow different. She went on to say "The coins That are included in the America the Beautiful Quarters Rolls and Bags do not have the uncirculated finish. They have a circulated finish that have not been in ciculation." Circulated finish? I've never heard of that. I thought that I understood, but I think I'm confused now.


Quote:
Chat Transcript
14:55:02 Thank you for shopping with the United States Mint! Is there anything I can assist you with?
14:55:02 [Visitor] Yes, why are the -S uncirculated quarters not included in the annual mint sets?
14:55:12 [Alicia] Hello, my name is Alicia. With whom do I have the pleasure to chat with today?
14:55:44 [Visitor] Bret
14:56:07 [Alicia] Hi, Bret! I will be happy to assist you with your product inquiry! Can you please tell me if you are referring to the Uncirculated Coin Sets?
14:56:58 [Visitor] Yes, the one that will be up for sale on May 14th.
14:59:15 [Alicia] The Uncirculated Coin Set 2018 contains two folders of 10 coins each, one from the United States Mint at Philadelphia and the other from the United States Mint at Denver, for a total of 20 coins. The Uncirculated Coin Sets have only been minted in Philadelphia and Denver. There has not been any uncirculated coins minted in the San Francisco Mint. However, the Silver Proof Set 2018 and the Proof Set 2018 will have a proof version of the coin you are requesting.
14:59:27 [Alicia] I apologize for the inconvenience this maycause.
14:59:32 [Alicia] *may cause.
15:01:32 [Alicia] Are you still with me? I have not heard from you for a few minutes.
15:01:45 [Visitor] Yes, I'm here.
15:01:51 [Alicia] Is there anything else I can assist you with today?
15:02:32 [Visitor] There is a -S uncirculated quarter available. It's $18.95 for a roll of 40. I'm asking why that uncirculated coin is not included in the set.
15:04:38 [Alicia] 15:05:02 [Alicia] The terms circulated, uncirculated, and proof are referring to the finish and the way they were minted.
15:05:22 [Alicia] Uncirculated Coins are hand-loaded into the coining press and struck on specially burnished blanks, The coins That are included in the America the Beautiful Quarters Rolls and Bags do not have the uncirculated finish. They have a circulated finish that have not been in ciculation.
yet have a soft, matte-like finish appearance. They are made like circulating coins (which are used every day as money), but with a special process that produces a brilliant finish.
15:06:01 [Alicia] Circulated coins are produced for circulations, but those sold directly by the United States Mint are never released to the Federal Reserve Bank.
15:06:13 [Visitor] OK. Thank you.
15:06:16 [Alicia] It's my pleasure! Is there anything else I can assist you with today?
15:06:27 [Visitor] No. Have a great day.
15:06:31 [Alicia] Thank you for shopping with the United States Mint, we're happy to assist you today and in the future. For additional information on our products please visit our website at http://www.catalog.usmint.gov. Should you need further assistance from the United States Mint, please feel free to contact us at 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). For your convenience, we are available seven days a week between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 12 midnight, Eastern Standard Time.


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United States
63556 Posts
 Posted 04/23/2018  5:09 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Am I correct in understanding that the quarter rolls and quarters in the mint sets are currently produced using the same process?
No, you are not correct. Mint set coins are handled differently than circulation strike coins (which are released to circulation as well as used to fill bags and rolls). They are made on presses that run at a slower speed and at higher pressure. The coins are also given a little extra care in the process. I am not sure how different the blanks are since they stopped doing satin finish after 2010.
Pillar of the Community
United States
5600 Posts
 Posted 04/23/2018  7:11 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Earle42 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
It's kind of irritating that you don't really have a complete set after purchasing both the proof and mint sets each year.


It used to be getting both made a complete set. But now (and I like them) you need to have the silver proof set and then also (which I don't like) you have to make more purchases for circulated issues.
- When I value " being right" more than what IS right, I am then right...a fool.
- How much squash could a Sasquatch squash if a Sasquatch would squash squash?
- Real men play Fizzbin.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1080 Posts
 Posted 04/24/2018  3:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bret to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
No, you are not correct. Mint set coins are handled differently than circulation strike coins (which are released to circulation as well as used to fill bags and rolls). They are made on presses that run at a slower speed and at higher pressure. The coins are also given a little extra care in the process. I am not sure how different the blanks are since they stopped doing satin finish after 2010.

I read on the mint's website that the mint set coins "are struck on special presses using greater force than circulating coins". However, I've seen nothing to indicate that the blanks are any different nor that they're treated differently after being struck. Although they do generally look nice, there are still contact marks from other coins present. The coins in mint sets generally do look better than those from rolls, but I've found that some of those from US Mint rolls look just as nice. Looking at the coins by themselves, it's often hard to say for sure if one came from a mint set or a roll.
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United States
63556 Posts
 Posted 04/24/2018  4:27 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Looking at the coins by themselves, it's often hard to say for sure if one came from a mint set or a roll.
I agree, which is why I do not differentiate them for my sets. Once you free them from the set the guarantee of their source identity is lost.

The 2005-2010 satin finish may be a different story. They seem easier to spot outside of their sets, but I do not feel compelled to include them in my sets either.
Pillar of the Community
United States
1080 Posts
 Posted 04/24/2018  4:51 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bret to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The 2005-2010 satin finish may be a different story. They seem easier to spot outside of their sets, but I do not feel compelled to include them in my sets either.

I do feel compelled to include the satin and regular business strikes in my sets. I try to find the most brilliant (more proof like, not satin like) business strikes for my sets so that the contrast is more obvious.
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United States
63556 Posts
 Posted 04/24/2018  5:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I try to find the most brilliant (more proof like, not satin like) business strikes for my sets so that the contrast is more obvious.
If you feel compelled, then that seems like the right way to do it. That contrast probably looks really good in an album or set.
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