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1971-D Kennedy Half Dollar - Silver?

 
 
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 Posted 12/06/2018  6:16 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add StackerP to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi, I to have a coin that I am sure is some silver. It is a 1971 D and definitely different from the rest. It weighs 11.2 oz and I really need some help with this. Thanks
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 Posted 12/06/2018  6:39 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
11.2 oz. I don't think so. That would be as heavy as a package of Ham. LOL You mean grams.
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 Posted 12/06/2018  8:35 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add fortcollins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Here are the comparative specs:

40% half (1965-70):
weight: 11.50g +/- 0.40g
specific gravity: 9.53

CNC half (1971-date):
weight: 11.34g +/- 0.45g
specific gravity: 8.92

Because of the overlapping weight tolerances, you will need to do a specific gravity test to answer the question.
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 Posted 12/06/2018  8:59 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
To this coin looks like glue is coating both surfaces of the coin?
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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 Posted 12/07/2018  4:43 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to the Community!

Your reply was split into its own topic for the proper attention.
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 Posted 12/07/2018  6:46 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add SilverDollar2017 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
and an accurate weight - I doubt it's 11.2 oz.
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 Posted 12/07/2018  8:02 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add USSID18 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
you will need to do a specific gravity test to answer the question.


What's a gravity test? I'm thinking more of an audio test.
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 Posted 12/07/2018  9:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Halo1st to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A little more info might help. Thanks, Doug.
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 Posted 12/07/2018  9:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add macmercury to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
A tissue test would help.

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 Posted 12/07/2018  11:59 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add fortcollins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Testing specific gravity of a coin is quick and easy. Here's what you will need:

1. A scale that reads to .01 grams or better. Since specific gravity is a ratio, it doesn't matter if the scale is accurate as long as it is precise.

2. A small plastic cup, preferably hard clear plastic. A plastic kids juice glass works fine.

3. A foot or so of thread.

4. Water. (I prefer distilled water, just to protect the coin a bit.)

Step one: tare the scale (manually reset it to zero).

Step two: weigh the coin while it is dry. I weight it once, tare the scale again and weigh it a second time. The weighings should be no more than +/- .02 apart. If they are, something went wrong. In that case, tare the scale again and weigh the coin again. Write the weight on a piece of paper.

Step three: fill the cup with enough water so that you eventually can dangle the coin in the cup with the water fully covering the coin without the coin touching the bottom or sides of the cup.

Step four: tie the thread around the coin so that it holds the coin securely and you have enough length of thread to suspend the coin in the water and hold the thread securely.

Step five: Place the cup with the water in it on the scale and then tare the scale. The scale should read 0.00.

Step six: Carefully dangle the coin in the cup, entirely beneath the surface of the water, without the coin touching the bottom or sides. The scale will settle on a reading. Write this number on the paper.

Step seven: Arithmetic time. Divide the Step Two number (dry value) by the reading from Step Six (wet value). Double check the arithmetic. The resulting number is specific gravity of the coin.

There are also hundreds of YouTube videos showing how to obtain and compare specific gravity of coins.

As a side note, if the issue involved a 90% U.S. or 80% Canadian silver coin, two other tests -- the "ping" test and an eddy current brake test -- can corroborate or rule out silver. These tests could slightly damage coins with numismatic value, however.
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 Posted 12/08/2018  10:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add USSID18 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
fortcollins- Really? Never heard of that! Very interesting! Thanks for that details explanation and feedback. I'm going to YouTube and watch that. Thanks!
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