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50 State Quarters And Their Designs

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 Posted 06/30/2020  10:39 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Dino Dosenbier to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi Community!
I have been collecting coins from all over the world since I was a kid, but I somehow never got very deep into American coinage so far. Now I want to re-start my collection, starting with the 50 State Quarters. Not only to collect, but also to learn about the US-History and the history of each State. By exermining the State Quarters' designs and layouts carefully, I detectet some recurring features.
For example, some States use their official nicknames on the coins like "The First State", "The Bay State" or "The Old Line State" and so on - but not all States do so.
Many States use their own state outlines as a feature, like Pennsylvania, Georgia, Massachusetts and others - but again, not all do so.
Then some States use their official state motto like "Virtue, Liberty, Independence" or "Wisdom, Justice, Moderation".
At least, some designs feature stars that symbolize the State, like 11 stars for New York, 9 stars for New Hampshire, 19 stars for Indiana.
And sometimes it's only a symbol like the peach in the case of Georgia (The Peach State) or a keystone for Pennsylvania (The Keystone State).

So my questions: how come, that there are no general layout specifications. A State uses none, only one or a combination of those described features...
And another question regarding Tennessee: why are there three stars on the coin? In any case, it is not the third state anyway...
Thank you,
Dino
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 Posted 06/30/2020  1:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add John1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
to CCF.
John1
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 Posted 06/30/2020  4:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
And another question regarding Tennessee: why are there three stars on the coin?


From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flag_of_Tennessee
Quote:
The stars represent the three geographically and legally distinct "Grand Divisions" of Tennessee (i.e. East Tennessee, Middle Tennessee, and West Tennessee).
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 Posted 06/30/2020  7:13 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add fortcollins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'll add a couple questions:
Tennessee quarter: Unless the designer was a Keith Richards fan, why does the Tennessee quarter depict a five-string guitar?
Wyoming quarter: Why did Wyoming commemorate a two-dimensional license plate logo on its quarter?

Now I'll duck and cover.
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 Posted 06/30/2020  7:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bzookaj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
how come, that there are no general layout specifications.

Because there was no general layout. Each state got to choose how it was represented in its quarter, usually by committee or contest. Some went plain, like state outlines. Others chose differently. Virginia chose to depict the three ships that brought the original settlers. North Carolina chose the first flight by the Wright brothers.
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 Posted 07/01/2020  01:40 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There was no "general outline" decreed in the authorizing legislation, and in most cases the individual state opened up the design process to their citizens and they were free to come up with whatever design they wanted. The submitted designs then went through a selection committee that whittle if down to just a few choices and then the Governor would them select one from those few.

The mint engravers would then render the submitted design into a coinable form. This lead to some problems and complaints when some of the final coin designs did not match the artists submitted design. It reached a head with the Missouri design to the extent that the artist had several thousand sticker printed up with his original design and stuck them over the released design on the coins.

After that the mint would no longer accept actual design pictures, only written verbal descriptions of the design.
Gary Schmidt
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 Posted 07/01/2020  02:42 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add mtuma3 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I'll confuse you even more.
Illinois Has Abraham Lincoln inside the state outline with the Chicago skyline in the background.
It also says "Land of Lincoln" on it. Lincoln was born in Kentucky, but lived most of his adult life in Illinois, and is buried here.
The vehicle license plates in Illinois also say "Land of Lincoln" on them, but the official State motto is actually "The Prairie State"
and for everyone outside of Illinois, it is pronounced "IL-In-Oye"... not "Il-In-Noise" the "S" is silent...
Mark
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My7070
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 Posted 07/01/2020  2:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add captaincoffee to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Tennessee quarter: Unless the designer was a Keith Richards fan, why does the Tennessee quarter depict a five-string guitar?
Wyoming quarter: Why did Wyoming commemorate a two-dimensional license plate logo on its quarter?


1. Nashville (music)
2. I think they forgot about the homework assignment and just drew something quickly as the teacher was telling them to hand it in.
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 Posted 07/01/2020  2:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dino Dosenbier to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Community!

Thank you for all the feedbacks so far!
five-string guitar? I'm not sure. Have to check this someday.
Three Stars! On the flag! Oh my..., how silly I can be. Sorry for that question. I have to learn a lot!
Wyoming license plate: yeah, that seems familiar to me somehow - long forgotten.
"IL-In-Oye" - the same like "Ar-kan-saw" I guess?

By the way: in Germany we have a similar coins-series of the 2-Coin, depicting a symbol (important building) of each "State" = german "Bundesland".
I remember, it had been dispute and discussion on this or that design here in Germany also. People just like to argue. No big deal.

Best regards,
Dino

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 Posted 07/01/2020  2:48 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Why did Wyoming commemorate a two-dimensional license plate logo on its quarter?
Bucking Horse and Rider


Quote:
Wyoming sought to counter rampant counterfeiting of the state's license plate when it debuted the horse and rider image in 1936 as part of its license plate design. It is now the longest-running license plate motif in the world.
I find that impressive.
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 Posted 07/01/2020  3:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Dino Dosenbier to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@jbuck: thanx for that wiki-link! That makes sense!
Can't believe this trademark is so old. Wow.
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 Posted 07/02/2020  11:44 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Earle42 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Tennessee quarter: Unless the designer was a Keith Richards fan, why does the Tennessee quarter depict a five-string guitar?

Google "Grand Ole Opry."

I find on youtube, all the time, where modern youth are rediscovering the incredible talenta that have been mostly covered by time and modern culture. Yet these people were so important to those who came before us and laid the foundations of modern society.

A more simple answer is Country used to be called Country and Western - Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, etc. never used an electric guitar

@jbuck

Quote:
Wyoming sought to counter rampant counterfeiting of the state's license plate when it debuted the horse and rider image in 1936 as part of its license plate design. It is now the longest-running license plate motif in the world.

Wow - interesting! New appreciation of this quarter acquired

@mtuma

Quote:
for everyone outside of Illinois, it is pronounced "IL-In-Oye"... not "Il-In-Noise" the "S" is silent

I remember back in elementary school (late 60s and early 70s) being taught, "There is no noiZE in 'IL-In-Oye'." I guess they don't teach these kind of things anymore?!
- When I value " being right" more than what IS right, I am then right...a fool.
- How much squash could a Sasquatch squash if a Sasquatch would squash squash?
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 Posted 07/02/2020  12:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
A more simple answer is Country used to be called Country and Western
Reminds of that scene from The Blues Brothers...

Elwood: What kind of music do you usually have here?

Claire: Oh, we got both kinds. We got country and western


Quote:
I remember back in elementary school (late 60s and early 70s) being taught, "There is no noiZE in 'IL-In-Oye'.
Only acceptable when referencing this Sufjan Stevens album.
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 Posted 07/02/2020  1:07 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Bump111 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
why does the Tennessee quarter depict a five-string guitar?


It's actually a six-string guitar (count the tuning machines). Maybe Keith broke a string?
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 Posted 07/02/2020  1:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bzookaj to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Unless the designer was a Keith Richards fan, why does the Tennessee quarter depict a five-string guitar?

Leave it to the Mint's kid's page to explain:

Quote:
It has three stars that stand for the state's three areas, and three musical instruments for the state's three most popular kinds of music.

A fiddle stands for the bluegrass music of the mountains of east Tennessee. A guitar stands for the country music of central Tennessee, where Nashville is. A trumpet stands for the blues of west Tennessee and the city of Memphis.

https://www.usmint.gov/learn/kids/l...rs/tennessee

Also Gibson is based in Nashville, with factories in Nashville and Memphis (and a third in Bozeman, MT).
Edited by bzookaj
07/02/2020 1:29 pm
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