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In Search Of Anyone Who Owns Or Knows Of A 1953 Henning Nickel

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 Posted 11/28/2020  7:43 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add Nickelcollectr85 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I've collected henning nickels for over 10 years now and have really enjoyed seeing all the different photos of the henning nickels every one has listed. I've come across photos on google of the infamous 1953 henning with a looped R but have actually never found a person that has owned one. Would really like to hear the story of how they came across it or who gave it to them. Just the history in the coin is unbelievable to hear
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 Posted 11/29/2020  04:43 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add John1 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
( I'm no pro, it's just my humble opinion )
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 Posted 11/29/2020  06:28 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
There are several CCF members with extensive Henning collections. Several years ago I wrote a thread that many contributed to that summarized all the 'known' info on Hennings.

Let me see if I can find it.
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 Posted 11/29/2020  06:30 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Take a look at my other hobby ... http://www.finewoodcrafter.com
Too many hobbies .... too much work .... not enough time.
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 Posted 11/30/2020  5:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nickelcollectr85 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the thread I've read through a lot of these and haven't found anyone with images of the 53 henning. If I recall correctly the thread that had it was an image found on the internet but nobody knew who it belonged to.
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 Posted 11/30/2020  8:01 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add fortcollins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
IIRC, contemporary news stories suggest that Henning began with 1947 counterfeits. Some of the stories suggest that he turned a sizeable number of his counterfeits in to a bank, and the teller questioned why he had so many 1947 nickels. That, supposedly, was a motivation for using a variety of dates. The myth or mystery of the nickels dumped in the river may also relate to the supposed sixth obverse and reverse dies. The 1944 was clearly what precipitated his arrest. It is not unreasonable to suspect that was the last date or close to the last date he counterfeited. Many news stories suggest that he lost money on every counterfeit because of materials and labor expenses. Some ancestry sites suggest that he died in Massachusetts in 1963.

A few thoughts on the hunt:
There may never have been a sixth die. Henning was a thief, and it is hardly a stretch to imagine a thief being a liar.
We are approaching two-thirds of a century since his arrest. That's a very long time for collectors to hunt for examples. I seriously doubt that there is an undiscovered date still lurking in the wild.
Weight, porosity, apparent wear, poor strike quality, and surface appearance are possible indicators, but we need to remember that the three mints did not exactly strike pristine five cent pieces during this era, either. I suspect that specific gravity would be a better indicator.
The damaged "R" is still the best eyeball indicator for non-1944 Hennings.
Oxymoron aside, and authenticated Henning counterfeit is the way to go for the non-1944, non-damaged-"R" examples.
Hennings deserve to be considered with the other famous contemporary counterfeits, such as the micro-O Morgans.
It might be fun to submit FOIA requests for the inventory of items seized in connection with his arrest.
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 Posted 12/01/2020  6:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nickelcollectr85 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Fortcollins you are exactly right about hearing that there was 6 dates of the henning nickel and I myself believe that he was referring to 2 dies of the same year. He did the interview and talked about all of them but wouldn't release the last die date and there's never been another found. Several people believe that the 1943 no mint mark could be the unknown missing date but with study the coin isn't the same metal as used by henning hints the fact that they are just a worn coin and damaged coins minted by the US mint. Also the Looped R would be a great indicator of the last missing date. It would be very unlikely that he chose not to use the looped R on just one year and making so many he would have made at least one by error. There's never been another date found with the Looped R .... I read several notes that he experimented with other coins in his process of counterfeiting and said the nickel was the easiest to copy and was still profitable with all the materials involved. I do think he was very intelligent and made other famous contemporary counterfeits.
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 Posted 12/02/2020  12:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Ballyhoo to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Found one listed on EBAY. Looks legit, but the price? Wow!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1953-Henni...AOSwAaVfxzLc
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 Posted 12/02/2020  2:28 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nickelcollectr85 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's not correct markings are way off ive been studying these for 10+ years and have seen lots of looped R henning a the loop is a lot more prominent than in the image also the hennings don't have the bottom cross bar on the letter R. In the description they also said it has the known die crack but its not on the correct location as the die cracks I've seen the crack will extend from the top right of Monticello and hit the letter S on the left bottom side I'll upload and image in a little while
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 Posted 12/02/2020  2:41 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nickelcollectr85 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

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 Posted 12/03/2020  11:00 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add JC Stevens to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nickelcollectr85 is correct, the listing on eBay is NOT a Henning. None of the Die Markers match.
http://www.error-ref.com/henning-co...feit-nickel/
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 Posted 12/03/2020  1:32 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add msl2196 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting. This is the first I've heard of this. What I'm curious about is why someone would go through the trouble to counterfeit Jefferson nickels (when one could have instead counterfeit more valuable currency), even in the 1950's when making them didn't incur a loss.

@fortcollins You talk about an "authenticated Henning counterfeit" in your post. Will grading companies actually authenticate these as a "genuine counterfeit" coin--or do they just seize them instead?
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 Posted 12/03/2020  3:06 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nickelcollectr85 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Msl2196 the first time I'd ever heard of these was when I was reading "The Official Red Book" by Whitman a guide to United States coins. I've collected Jefferson nickels and was updating my coin list and prices for the newest year book when I noticed a notation in the War Nickel section. It reads " Note: 1944 nickels without mintmarks are counterfeit". Me having the same question as you why would someone make counterfeit nickel I quickly was searching the internet with lots of information regarding answers. From what I figured out he was actually profitable with the coins he estimated the coins cost 3 1/2 cents to make including buying the materials. What a lot of people don't realize is he made 6 different dies with different dates when interviewed he released 5 dates and left the last to be a mystery. The years are as followed 1939,1944,1946,1947,and 1953. Also with the research I've read that all the years released share a common marking indicator the Looped R as well as sever different die cast bubbles..
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 Posted 12/03/2020  4:18 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Zurie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It would be easy if all Henning nickels had the looped R and/or the die crack marker, but my understanding is that some don't have either. I agree that the 1953 currently listed on eBay does not have the look of a Henning, but other than surface appearance and possibly high weight, I'm not sure if there is a sure way of confirming a non-1944 Henning.
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 Posted 12/03/2020  4:34 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Nickelcollectr85 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Zurie if your referring to non-1944 henning to not having the Loop-R there's a great way to know for sure by a casting bubble on the obverse side of the coin between the D in GOD and the W in We here's an image I've collected out of my personal henning collection and it's a great indicator to help on worn coins have seen this on several coins listed online
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 Posted 12/04/2020  10:15 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Conder101 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
What I'm curious about is why someone would go through the trouble to counterfeit Jefferson nickels (when one could have instead counterfeit more valuable currency), even in the 1950's when making them didn't incur a loss.

He was making circulating counterfeits, and if he made larger denominations, and didn't want to be caught, he would have had to use roughly the proper alloy (90% silver) which would have increased his expenses greatly for not much increase in profit. The profit from each quarter would have still been roughly the same as from each nickel. And for the most part no one paid as much attention to their base metal nickels as they would to their silver coins.

Ran some numbers and his profit from a counterfeit quarter of proper alloy in 1953 would have been about 3 cents per coin.
Gary Schmidt
Edited by Conder101
12/04/2020 10:21 am
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