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1944 Wheat Cent. A Head Scratching Anomaly, Open To Interpretation.

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Valued Member
United States
349 Posts
 Posted 06/12/2021  10:12 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add KeepTheChange to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Poll Question

Here is a coin ive kept in my collection for a while now due to the fact that I cannot explain or determine how exactly this is possible and/or achieved.

I have posted this in a couple of reliable groups in hopes to get some answers, and have received alot of mixed opinions....

Ive yet to post it here,and would love you guys to have a look at it. I value everyones input and look forward to what you guys think may have happened to this coin to be able to achieve the appearance shown in the photos below.

Notable details:

1.No visible points of impact on the obverse or reverse

2.No evidence of pushed over metal on obverse or reverse

3.No evidence at all of any pressure points or bent edges of the "crack"... eliminating the possibility of snips ect.

4.The inside surface of the "crack" are clean as a whistle...no rugged or ridged appearance at all.

5.A very tiny impression shows on the rim of the coin where the "crack" begins.

6. A very straight and uninterruped line shows on the reverse of the coin going thru ONE and CENT with no evidence of damage.

7. The coin is slightly bent (as shown in photos) but only in the particular area effected.

Highlighted opinions

*Leading expert in errors,Mike diamond,suggested it was damage..but could not determine how it was accomplished,nor was it relevant.

*Die variety expert and owner of the coppercoins website Chuck Daughtry suggested it is a genuine error caused by issues involving the striking chamber,and stressed how there isn't a tool in existence that can possibly achieve this look without damaging to the coins surface.

My initial impression was a split planchet or a lamination that was tampered with after leaving the mint...but I cannot prove either...leading me to nothing more than....damage.. due to lack of supporting evidence of its authenticity

So...what do YOU think?

More pics can be posted upon request. I tried my best to highlight everything that I could.

please FEEL FREE TO SUBMIT A SIMPLE ANSWER IN THE POLL BELOW

















Poll Choices
  Post mint Damage
  Genuine error
  Error that was tampered with
  Not sure

It isn't searched if you dont know what you are looking for.
Edited by KeepTheChange
06/12/2021 10:51 am
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52433 Posts
 Posted 06/12/2021  10:29 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looks deliberate because of the location exactly on the same N devices. Some areas showing slight chipping. Possibly cut with diamond coated thread or wire. The location was the tip off for me. Never seen this before, just guessing how it could be accomplished. Like they would use to cut off a ring or even metal in a physical injury to cut metal in a hospital.
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
Edited by coop
06/12/2021 11:21 am
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United States
1975 Posts
 Posted 06/12/2021  10:34 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jasper62 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Looks like it was an incomplete shear job in a machine shop. notice to the right of the split the rim has been flattened. Someone started to shear it off but stopped. IMOH
Valued Member
United States
349 Posts
 Posted 06/12/2021  10:37 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add KeepTheChange to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@coop A thread or wire would have to extend the entire surface length to get as clean of a cut as this,the only other way would be using the wire/thread starting at the rims edge...which would show clean evidence on both sides,not just the reverse...which it does not. It is interesting at the very least.
It isn't searched if you dont know what you are looking for.
Edited by KeepTheChange
06/12/2021 10:45 am
Valued Member
United States
349 Posts
 Posted 06/12/2021  10:41 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add KeepTheChange to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@jasper shears would dent the copper inward due to pressure from the tool. which I do not see here. Plausible ,but not probable imo. Look how clean that edge is.


It isn't searched if you dont know what you are looking for.
Edited by KeepTheChange
06/12/2021 10:44 am
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 Posted 06/12/2021  10:57 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 11997755 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Maybe some sort of lamination in the stock ?
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 Posted 06/12/2021  11:17 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Zurie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting defect. There's virtually no space where the crack tapers off to indicate a wire saw cut. Is the obverse crack jagged, or is that just an illusion from the contour of Lincoln's jacket? Maybe some kind of planchet defect that was intact when the coin was struck, then was separated and twisted afterwards?
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 Posted 06/12/2021  11:21 am  Show Profile   Check VestigeWolf's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add VestigeWolf to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Just a cracked planchet IMO. After years of circulation it could easily be bent a bit.
Discovering the truth does not have all the answers.
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 Posted 06/12/2021  11:36 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add 11997755 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I was looking at your second forth image. The "cut" is jagged and the metal inside the edges edges of the 'cut" is not smooth but rough and textured. A saw cut would be straight and the edge would be smooth. Somehow the planchet cracked. There was a weak spot in the metal. i.e. a lamination. IMO
Edited by 11997755
06/12/2021 11:39 am
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52433 Posts
 Posted 06/12/2021  1:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add coop to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Note how he covered that area so no one could see them?
Richard S. Cooper
Some have asked about my images I use and I'm glad to say, you can now you can see the DVD in sections on youtube:
1. Intro, older coins, toned coins 2. Doubled dies 3. Die events, One of a kind errors 4. So called errors, Coin information 5. Coin information Types and Varieties, Overlays
Jefferson nickel doubled dies Wexler/Rebar complete listings

trail dies:http://www.traildies.com/
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 Posted 06/12/2021  1:55 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add T-BOP to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
My opinion is a defective planchet, coin was struct and entered circulation thus defect got bigger .

In Memory of Butch L.
and Jim U. rest in peace .
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United States
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 Posted 06/12/2021  1:57 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add halfamind to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It's cut. Just not 100% sure how. There's a guy on this forum who cuts coins into friendship necklaces and such. He posted in the last month or two with some new work. Can't remember his username, though.
Valued Member
United States
275 Posts
 Posted 06/12/2021  2:03 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add halfamind to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Found the saw link I was looking for:
http://goccf.com/t/398697#3413643

Maybe the OP's coin got cut with someone practicing with this type of tool?
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 Posted 06/12/2021  2:21 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add fortcollins to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@KeepTheChange, Would you be able to take a clearer photo of this area from this angle? Thanks!

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 Posted 06/12/2021  2:26 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add KeepTheChange to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@fortcollins sure thing,ill get you a good image when I get off work
It isn't searched if you dont know what you are looking for.
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United States
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 Posted 06/12/2021  2:44 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add bokem44 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
How about a possible errant cut on the original planchet sheet?
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