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US Commemorative Coin Series: Quick Bits #11 - Conjoined Portraits

 
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 Posted 01/03/2021  10:52 am Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
The use of conjoined (or jugate) portraits within the classic series of US commemorative coins was quite popular with ten of 48 half dollar types - 21%! - making use of the design approach.

The first coin to feature conjoined portraits was the 1900 Lafayette Memorial Dollar which depicts George Washington (forward portrait) and Frenchman Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette who was instrumental in helping the American forces defeat the British in the US' Revolutionary War.



There was roughly a 20-year gap until the next issue, the 1921 Alabama Statehood Centennial half dollar, was released. The coin depicts William Bibb, Alabama's first governor in 1819 and Thomas Kilby, the state's governor in 1919. (Note: Kilby was the first living person depicted on a US coin.)



The early- to mid-1920s was a popular time for coins with conjoined portraits. During this period, the 1923 Monroe Doctrine Centennial coin, featuring circa 1823 President James Monroe (rear portrait) and Secretary of State John Adams was released. It was soon followed by the 1924 Huguenot-Walloon half dollar which depicts Admiral Gaspard de Coligny (forward portrait) and William the Silent.





In 1926, the American Independence Sesquicentennial half dollar was issued with portraits of George Washington (forward portrait), the first US President, and Calvin Coolidge, the president in 1926. [Note: Coolidge was the first sitting US president to appear on a US coin; he was the second living person ever to appear on a US coin.]



A near decade-long gap then occurred, with the next coin with conjoined portraits not appearing until 1935 when the Arkansas Statehood Centennial commemorative program was launched; the state marked its centennial in 1936, but its commemorative coins were issued annually from 1935 through 1939. The coins feature conjoined portraits of Miss Liberty (forward portrait) and a representative member of the local Quapaw tribe of Native Americans.



The 1936 Long Island Tercentenary half dollar followed. It presented a representative Dutch colonist (forward portrait) and a representative member of the local Algonquin tribe of Native Americans.



The Battle of Gettysburg half dollar was next, it was struck and released in 1937 (though dated "1936"). The coin features portraits meant to be representative of the Union (forward portrait) and Confederate soldiers who fought at the battle. The Battle of Antietam half dollar was also struck and released in 1937. It features Union General George McClellan and Confederate General Robert E. Lee (forward portrait).





The final US classic commemorative coin with conjoined portraits didn't appear until 1951, with the release of the Carver-Washington half dollar; the coin depicts George W. Carver (forward portrait) and Booker T. Washington.



As I also consider the coins struck for the US Territory / Commonwealth of the Philippines to be US coins (they include "United States of America" on them!), I need also mention the two One Peso commemorative coins issued to mark the Philippines' transition from Territory to Commonwealth in 1935. The first Peso features portraits of Manuel Quezon (forward portrait), the first president of the Commonwealth, and Frank Murphy, the last US Governor-General of the Philippines; Quezon and Murphy also appear on the US-PI 50 Centavos commemorative coin but are depicted as facing each other vs. conjoined. The second Peso depicts Quezon and US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt; Roosevelt is shown behind Quezon's portrait but his portrait is moved out from behind Quezon's to show more of his profile.




So, just like with countries around the world, conjoined portraits have proven to be a popular design approach for US commemorative coins - they make for an interesting subset of the overall series!

I've posted about all of the above coins, you can find them here - Read More: Commems Collection.


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
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 Posted 01/03/2021  11:08 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Excellent presentation, thank you sir.
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 Posted 01/03/2021  9:08 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CelticKnot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, commems.

Is "Long Islan" a misprint on your label or is that intentional?

It looks as though you were aiming at classic commemoratives with this Quck Bits but would you consider the 2015 5-star Generals $1 silver coin a conjoined design? The heads don't overlap but the shoulders do.
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 Posted 01/03/2021  11:17 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add captaincoffee to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nice set of coins.
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 Posted 01/04/2021  11:28 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Excellent presentation!

Proud to say I have at least one of these examples in my collection.
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 Posted 07/25/2021  08:00 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
I know it's bad form to resurrect old threads, but it bothers me when I discover I missed answering a question or two posed within one of my threads when it was was "fresh." So, @CelticKnot, here you go!

Quote:
Is "Long Islan" a misprint on your label or is that intentional?

No, it's not a misprint. At the time, that is how PCGS spelled/abbreviated "Long Island" on their insert to make it conform with its defined character limit. (The 1935 Connecticut Tercentenary half dollar also had an unusual spelling - "Connectct" - dropping the "u" to stay within the 10-character limit.) Since that time, the company has implemented a new format for their inserts and "Long Island" is now spelled out in its entirety - so is "Connecticut!"


Quote:
It looks as though you were aiming at classic commemoratives with this Quick Bits but would you consider the 2015 5-star Generals $1 silver coin a conjoined design? The heads don't overlap but the shoulders do.

Yes, I was focused on the classic-era series for this Quick Bits post. There are quite a few coins within the modern series that feature conjoined portraits, however.
I would include:

- 1990 Eisenhower Centennial Silver Dollar - Conjoined portraits of same individual - some guy name Eisenhower
- 1993 World War II 50th Anniversary CuNi Half Dollar - Three conjoined portraits
- 1994 Women in Military Service Silver Dollar - Five conjoined portraits!
- 2003 First Flight Centennial Silver Dollar
- 2013 Girl Scouts of the USE Centennial Silver Dollar - Three conjoined portraits
- 2015 March of Dimes Silver Dollar
- 2016 National Park Service 100th Anniversary Gold Half Eagle
- 2020 Women's Suffrage Centennial Silver Dollar - Three conjoined portraits
- 2021 National Law Enforcement Memorial and Museum Gold Half Eagle

I don't consider the following to be conjoined portrait coins, however, even though some do have a bit of portrait overlap:

- 2011 United States Army Silver Dollar
- 2013 Five-Star Generals Silver Dollar
- 2013 Five-Star Generals CuNi Half Dollar
- 2017 Boys Town CuNi Half Dollar
- 2018 Breast Cancer Awareness Coins


Hope that answers your question, albeit belatedly!


Collecting history one coin or medal at a time! (c) commems. All rights reserved.
Edited by commems
07/25/2021 09:40 am
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 Posted 07/25/2021  09:13 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add CelticKnot to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@commems, thanks for the answers!

And can definitely see why you don't consider the 5-Star designs conjoined. It would appear that we both made errors, however. The 5-Star General commemoratives were from 2013, not 2015 (me) or 2012 (you).

Quote:
...would you consider the 2015 5-star Generals $1 silver coin a conjoined design?


Quote:

I don't consider the following to be conjoined portrait coins...

- 2012 Five-Star Generals Silver Dollar
- 2012 Five-Star Generals CuNi Half Dollar
Edited by CelticKnot
07/25/2021 11:22 am
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 Posted 07/25/2021  09:14 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add muddler to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
And here are some moderns:

2003 First Flight $


2011 US Army


2013 Five Star General


2015 March of Dimes


2016 National Parks
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 Posted 07/25/2021  09:47 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@CelticKnot: Thanks for the correction - good eye! I edited my post for the sake of accuracy going forward.

@Muddler: Thanks for the images! FWIW, I don't consider the 2011 US Army silver dollar or the 2013 Five-Star Generals dollar to be conjoined portrait coins. I don't think they fit the bill!




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 Posted 07/25/2021  09:59 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add commems to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Around the same time I wrote my original "Conjoined Portraits" post, I also prepared one on a related set of coins in my collection.

If you'd like to learn more about a three-piece commemorative coin set from Bolivia in which the common design of the coins reminds me of the 1926 US Sesquicentennial half dollar, check this one out:

- 1926 American Independence Sesquicennial - Distant Relative.



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 Posted 07/26/2021  12:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
...I would include... - 1990 Eisenhower Centennial Silver Dollar - Conjoined portraits of same individual - some guy name Eisenhower
Seems familiar...


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