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What Temperature Do Coins Melt? (Writing Advice)

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 Posted 11/05/2021  12:38 pm Show Profile   Bookmark this topic Add SwanS0ng to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I promise I'm not actually melting coins. I'm writing a mystery and needed advice (this definitely isn't one of the things I can just experiment with lol) At one point, of the characters melts a metal donation box filled with coins. The year it happens in the story is 2004 if that makes a difference. My apologies if this isn't allowed, thank you all for your help.
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 Posted 11/05/2021  12:50 pm  Show Profile   Check BigSilver's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add BigSilver to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
It depends on the composition of the coins. Silver coins will melt at a different temperature than copper-nickel coins. Simply put, this is not a coin question as much as it is a metal question.
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 Posted 11/05/2021  12:59 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add ijn1944 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Agree with Big Silver.
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 Posted 11/05/2021  1:00 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Coinfrog to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Big Silver calls it.



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 Posted 11/05/2021  1:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Zurie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Nickels, dimes, and quarters in circulation in 2004 are almost all cupronickel (about 75% copper, 25% nickel) and having a melting point of around 2140 degrees F. Pennies dated after 1982 are zinc and melt at 780 degrees F.
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 Posted 11/05/2021  3:24 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add dave700x to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Pennies dated after 1982 are zinc and melt at 780 degrees F


And rot at room temperature....
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 Posted 11/05/2021  3:40 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add keith12 to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Just depends whats the coin is made of

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 Posted 11/05/2021  4:22 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Spence to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
@swan, first welcome to CCF. Second, that is a fun little plot element. Depending on how technical your writing is, you could have it be hot enough to melt some coins, but not others.
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 Posted 11/05/2021  4:25 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add Zurie to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
And rot at room temperature...



Edited by Zurie
11/05/2021 4:28 pm
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 Posted 11/05/2021  5:05 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add sel_69l to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
All alloys, which include most coins, have a temperature 'paste range', where one of the metals in the alloy will have melting point lower than another.
The 'paste range' is the difference between the highest and lowest melting points of each metal in the alloy, where one metal is liquid (lowest MP) and another still solid (highest MP

The paste range of brass, which is a solid metallic solution of zinc and copper at room temperature, is between 419 Deg.C and 1063 deg.C. The physical paste characteristics depend on the proportion of the metals that make up the alloy.

Dross normally (depending on the metals involved), forms on the surface of the melt.
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 Posted 11/05/2021  6:38 pm  Show Profile   Check Pacificoin's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add Pacificoin to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Best of all are the chocolate coins .
They melt in your mouth at body temperature
..YUMMY
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 Posted 11/05/2021  7:15 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add TNG to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Please melt all the zinc Lincolns you can in the story.
Mix coins with magnesium, it burns hot.
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 Posted 11/08/2021  11:10 am  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add jbuck to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Please melt all the zinc Lincolns you can in the story. Mix coins with magnesium, it burns hot.
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 Posted 11/08/2021  5:23 pm  Show Profile   Bookmark this reply Add nickelsearcher to your friends list Get a Link to this Reply
Some funny replies to welcome our newest contributor the the CCF.


Quote:
the characters melts a metal donation box


Ahh - there is your missing answer Mr. Mystery writing man. You need to melt the box first before you can melt the coins.

Let's assume you plan your plot so that the melting character has a standard carbon steel container holding the coins.

Then the melter needs about 2500F just to get past the box. Then you can get to those pesky Cu-Ni nickels, dimes and quarters.

Hoping that your plot has all the Zinc Lincoln cents melted into an unidentifiable mass inside the box - just as they appear from everyday rot.
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